Issue date : Fri 11 June, 2021
Estimated Reading Time : 03 Min 18 Seconds
Number of items : 39
NSW rail network to go green by 2025, smaller ferries to go electric
The Sydney Morning Herald
Fri 11 June, 2021
The state’s train network will be powered by renewable energy within four years under an ambitious plan outlined by NSW Transport Minister Andrew Constance, who is also pushing to retrofit some harbour ferries with electric engines.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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How COVID forced the planet’s luckiest raincheck
The Sydney Morning Herald
Fri 11 June, 2021
The pandemic wrought havoc on big events. The Summer Olympics in Tokyo were delayed by a year. The American National Basketball Association sequestered hundreds of athletes inside a “bubble” at Disney World for most of the 2020 season. The Eurovision Song Contest was cancelled for the first time in its 65-year history. But for one event, the delay turned out to be a stroke of luck. In fact, it might even help save the planet.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Viscount Christopher Monckton: Lord of the lies on climate change
Independent Australia
Fri 11 June, 2021
Viscount Christopher Monckton, who describes climate science as a ‘monstrous hoax’ and a “bandwagon of lies”, has taken his own bandwagon of lies around the world on lecture tours.
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Pricing ESG risk in credit markets
Money Management
Fri 11 June, 2021
Back in 2017, we analysed the link between environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors, and credit spreads in an effort to refine our ability as fixed income investors to more accurately price factors beyond traditional operating and financial risks. We presented the results of that analysis in which we demonstrated that companies with better ESG practices tended to have lower credit default swap (CDS) spreads, even after controlling for credit ratings and other risk factors. Using the results, we plotted predictions of CDS spreads for given values of ESG scores, drawing an innovative implied ESG pricing curve.
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Friday essay: a rare bird — how Europeans got the black swan so wrong
The Conversation
Fri 11 June, 2021
The black swan is an Australian icon. The official emblem of Western Australia, depicted in the state flag and coat-of-arms, it decorates several public buildings. The bird is also the namesake for Perth’s Swan River, where the British established the Swan River Colony in 1829.
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Clean, green way to make ammonia fertilisers
Cosmos
Fri 11 June, 2021
A team of Australian scientists have developed a new, efficient way to make the critical agricultural product ammonia. The research could be used to make fertilisers directly on farms, using renewable energy, by the end of the decade.
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Industry slams Taylor’s favoured coal subsidy in response to ESB market options
Reneweconomy
Thu 10 June, 2021
The overwhelming majority of Australia’s rapidly transitioning electricity industry has rejected a key plank of proposed market reforms pushed by the federal Coalition, saying it will do nothing to boost reliability, ignores climate questions and will simply boost the bottom line of ageing coal generators.
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Folks, We’ve Hit Our ‘Politician Points At Cold Weather To Deny Climate Change’ Quota For 2021
Pedestrian
Thu 10 June, 2021
Just as tediously inevitable as wet shoes and cold fingers, so too is the annual arrival of the natural phenomena known as Politician Says Dumb Shit About Cold Weather In A Bid To Make Dumb Shit Point About Climate Change. And in this year’s performance, the role of Brian Genus is being played by Queensland LNP senator and coal-kissing goon Matt Canavan.
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Queensland pours $1.5b into energy fund to try to lower bills, hit emissions aim
The Brisbane Times
Thu 10 June, 2021
Under a $1.5 billion pre-budget funding announcement, Queensland-owned power companies will grow their own renewable generation and storage capacity in an effort to lower electricity prices and meet state emissions targets.
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The Age
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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No beach holiday: the five big issues on the menu at G7
The Sydney Morning Herald
Thu 10 June, 2021
London: As Scott Morrison, Joe Biden and Boris Johnson mingle on a beach at Cornwall’s picturesque Carbis Bay this Saturday evening, waiters will hand out canapes of sparkling scallops, crab claws and mackerel before a main meal of barbecued sirloin and lobster with scorched leeks.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Fighting for the truth about the Reef
The Spectator Australia
Thu 10 June, 2021
It is an injustice that turtles are blown up in the Gulf of Mexico because American oil companies choose a particular and inappropriate method for undertaking surveys before setting explosives. If they did underwater, rather than aerial surveys, it would be difficult to ever justify blowing up biological diverse artificial reefs that are old spent oil rigs. It is also an injustice when aerial surveys are undertaken to falsely conclude the Great Barrier Reef is more than 60 per cent bleached when underwater surveys give a completely different and true assessments.
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A 'victory for the great Australian art of taking the mickey'
AdNews
Thu 10 June, 2021
The Federal Court has confirmed that logos and other copyrighted material can be used without infringemement of the owner's rights as long as it is for the purpose of parody or satire.
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Innovation program launched to boost SMEs in energy supply chain
Utility Magazine
Thu 10 June, 2021
An Australian-first open innovation program, titled GeneratER, has been launched by National Energy Resources Australia (NERA) to boost small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in the energy resources supply chain and find local manufacturing and tech solutions to complex challenges.
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People’s odds of loneliness could fall by up to half if cities hit 30% green space targets
The Conversation
Thu 10 June, 2021
One in four Australians feel lonely on three or more days a week. Our longitudinal study, just published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, finds adults in neighbourhoods where at least 30% of nearby land was parks, reserves and woodlands had 26% lower odds of becoming lonely compared to their peers in areas with less than 10% green space. For people living on their own, the associations were even greater – in areas with 30% or more green space the odds of becoming lonely halved.
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Architecture and Design
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India closes all tiger reserves after Covid-19 outbreaks in zoos
News.com.au
Thu 10 June, 2021
Authorities in India have been forced to temporarily close all tiger reserves to tourism after a spate of Covid-19 outbreaks in zoos around the country and animal deaths from the disease.
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Looking for love, white rhino 'Emma' lands in Japan
Yahoo News
Thu 10 June, 2021
Like many of us, Emma has had her travel plans derailed by coronavirus. But after months of delay, the white rhino has arrived in Japan and is looking for love.
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Giant map of giant kelp forests
Cosmos
Thu 10 June, 2021
A paper published in Communications Earth & Environment has tracked 35 years of satellite data to create a comprehensive map of underwater giant kelp forests.
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Call to halt sale of synthetic refrigerants
The Fifth Estate
Thu 10 June, 2021
Newly identified long-term environmental and health risks have prompted calls to immediately stop synthetic refrigerants being phased in to tackle global heating, and replace them with natural refrigerants only.
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