Issue date : Thu 29 April, 2021
Estimated Reading Time : 03 Min 39 Seconds
Number of items : 43
Gas led recovery? AEMO says gas use in grid may all but disappear in 20 years
Reneweconomy
Thu 29 April, 2021
The federal Coalition government’s gas-led transition plans have again been questioned, this time by the Australian Energy Market Operator, which says overall gas consumption is likely to fall over the next 20 years and may virtually disappear in the grid because it can’t compete with renewables or green hydrogen.
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NSW Treasurer flags distance-based tax on electric vehicles
The Sydney Morning Herald
Thu 29 April, 2021
NSW Treasurer Dominic Perrottet has flagged imposing a distanced-based tax on electric vehicles but not before a more substantial take-up of the technology on the state’s roads.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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A health check on Australia’s grid transition show it must go faster
Reneweconomy
Thu 29 April, 2021
As we saw last week, the world’s biggest economies are, slowly but surely, ratcheting up their climate ambitions. For the US, for instance, an ambition for a fully clean grid by 2035 is one step closer, with an upcoming policy to set a target of 80% clean power by 2030; merely nine years from now. The bulk of this will be driven by wind and solar. And ditto for the UK, whose grid ambitions involve a 95-99% zero carbon grid by 2035.
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What key issues must the financial sector address post COVID-19?
Insurance Business
Thu 29 April, 2021
The financial sector took a hit during the COVID-19 pandemic, pushing regulators and insurance companies to figure out what emerging risks need addressing as the country recovers. The Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA) has identified three key issues critical to the sector's long-term strength and resilience.
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The health benefits of nature in cities
Cosmos
Thu 29 April, 2021
As humans sprawl over the planet and create urban heat islands and habitat degradation, our need for nature – especially for city dwellers – is becoming increasingly palpable.
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Satellites show world's glaciers melting faster than ever
ABC News
Thu 29 April, 2021
Glaciers are melting faster, losing 31 per cent more snow and ice per year than they did 15 years earlier, according to three-dimensional satellite measurements of all the world's mountain glaciers.
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9 News
Victorians urged not to throw out bread
7 News
Thu 29 April, 2021
Victorians are being urged to stop throwing out bread, with research showing the equivalent of 125 million loaves are ending up in waste each year.
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Perthnow
The Canberra Times
The Newcastle Herald
The West Australian
Yahoo News
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Coles embraces AI for fresh produce management
Inside Retail
Thu 29 April, 2021
Coles has partnered up with Finnish tech provider RELEX, to replace manual ordering systems for fresh fruit and veg with AI-enabled, cloud-based tech designed to improve efficiency and reduce waste.
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REVEALED: Al Gore’s real climate catastrophe
The Spectator Australia
Thu 29 April, 2021
Next month is the thirtieth anniversary of the most entertaining and damning chapter in Al Gore’s career.
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Podesta: Quad will demand Australia does more on climate change
The Sydney Morning Herald
Wed 28 April, 2021
London: Senior Democrat John Podesta has warned Australia will be confronted by its fellow Quad members over its weak carbon reduction targets as the Biden administration places climate change at the heart of its security agenda.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Carbon border tax is good in theory, bad in reality
The Australian Financial Review
Wed 28 April, 2021
In theory, a carbon border tax being considered by Europe and the United States makes economic sense if the world is to equitably cut greenhouse gas emissions.
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America’s fake steak panic could be next course in Australia’s climate war
Reneweconomy
Wed 28 April, 2021
The 2019 federal election in Australia was essentially the last possible chance the Morrison government would have to enact a culture war on electric vehicles. A litany of ludicrous claims about towing utes and ending weekends helped create a generalised anxiety about EVs, and likely contributed to their election win.
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Climate risks ‘very real and immediate,’ says APRA’s Byres
The Sydney Morning Herald
Wed 28 April, 2021
Financial regulator chairman Wayne Byres has raised the pressure on banks to consider the unique business risks of climate change, highlighting a drop in the value of emissions-intensive assets such as coal-fired power plants.
Also Appeared In
The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
Investor Daily
Biggest climate risk is not preparing: APRA
The Australian Financial Review
Biggest climate risk is do nothing: APRA
Origin seeks to gain from coal power cutbacks
The Australian Financial Review
Wed 28 April, 2021
Origin Energy is understood to have opted to cut back generation at its huge coal power station in NSW in favour of buying cheap electricity from the wholesale market early this year in an example of the responses by traditional generators to the soft demand and prices plaguing the sector.
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Has the coal lobby got the early drop on key energy market reforms?
Reneweconomy
Wed 28 April, 2021
As the Australian energy market awaits the release of detailed proposals for energy market reforms drafted by the Energy Security Board, expected to be released this week, there is growing concern in the industry that major incumbent fossil fuel companies have already received an early drop.
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As koalas fight for life in NSW, volunteers are replanting their burnt forests
The Sydney Morning Herald
Wed 28 April, 2021
Mark Wilson says over the years he has at times bored his children with stories of trees as they have driven the roads of the Northern Rivers of NSW, tales he tells while pointing out tall stands of tallowwood, forest red gum and swamp mahogany.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Slow the flow: Rehabilitating Australian rivers
Cosmos
Wed 28 April, 2021
A lot of water sounds like a good thing, but for Australian rivers, it really depends on where it is and how fast it is moving. To fix our rivers, we need to slow the flow.
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