Issue date : Wed 17 March, 2021
Estimated Reading Time : 03 Min 54 Seconds
Number of items : 46
OECD’s Mathias Cormann urges carbon tariff caution
The Australian Financial Review
Wed 17 March, 2021
Incoming secretary-general of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Mathias Cormann, has urged caution over the adoption of carbon tariffs, saying it would be preferable if each nation made the appropriate effort as part of a multilaterally co-ordinated approach to help the world achieve net zero emissions by 2050.
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Cormann’s lesson in the virtue of keeping promises
The Australian
Wed 17 March, 2021
The appointment of Mathias Cormann to head the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development provides a timely snapshot of where Australia really stands in global affairs, including on the issue of action on climate change.
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Cormann’s OECD campaign was a climate fakery trial run for Glasgow COP
Reneweconomy
Wed 17 March, 2021
At some point in the previous decade, the public acceptability of denying climate science disappeared, followed quickly by the acceptability of doing nothing to reduce emissions. Since then, much of the effort of Australia’s government on climate has focused on trying to create the illusion of progress.
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Renewables sector transformed into global asset class
Money Management
Wed 17 March, 2021
The appetite for renewable energy infrastructure and strong focus on environmental, social, governance (ESG) agendas has helped transform the sector into a highly competitive and global asset class, according to bfinance’s report.
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Finance, property giants leading the trend
The Australian Financial Review
Wed 17 March, 2021
CBA and Mirvac are among Australian companies showing a strong commitment to ESG.
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ESG performance being linked to pay
The Australian Financial Review
Wed 17 March, 2021
At Charter Hall, the staff aren’t only paid bonuses for improving the property owner and fund manager’s financial performance.
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Rock-solid growth in sustainable ETFs in year of pivots
The Australian Financial Review
Wed 17 March, 2021
Sustainable investing is taking the investor universe by storm as it is about beliefs as well as returns, says a global asset manager leading this trend.
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Ethical approach is making more revenue sense
The Australian Financial Review
Wed 17 March, 2021
Investors are prodding companies right in the soft underbelly to ensure ethics play a part in our collective wealth creation process.
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Quantifying ESG can put a relevant number on businesses
The Australian Financial Review
Wed 17 March, 2021
ESG scores are based on factors such as the environment, workers’ rights, equality, production of harmful products, animal treatment and carbon footprint.
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Sydney plans tree-planting blitz to curb heat
The Sydney Morning Herald
Wed 17 March, 2021
The City of Sydney will spend $377 million over the next decade to boost tree cover, including nudging residents to plant more vegetation, in a bid to counter the effects of a warming climate.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Native lizards hidden in potato chip tubes, socks bound for Hong Kong
News.com.au
Wed 17 March, 2021
A bid to export native lizards out of Australia hidden in potato chip tubes came undone after authorities busted a smuggling ring by analysing fingerprints and surveillance footage.
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Perthnow
The Australian
The Daily Telegraph
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Experts urge governments to follow health advice on climate, as they did with Covid
Reneweconomy
Tue 16 March, 2021
Leading Australian health practitioners, including former chief medical officers, have called on the Morrison government to prepare a new ‘National Strategy on Climate Change, Health and Well-being’, saying governments should listen to health experts, just as they did for the Covid-19 pandemic.
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Australian climate politics from the outside in
The Fifth Estate
Tue 16 March, 2021
OPINION: This year I will turn twenty five. I was born, and have grown up, under the looming shadow of environmental catastrophe, and even in my short, quarter-century lifespan, I have watched the climate deteriorate to the point that the childhood I remember has been killed off for good.
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Is the EU’s carbon levy the moment of truth for our political leaders?
The Fifth Estate
Tue 16 March, 2021
In November last year I wrote an article titled The Truth About Carbon Emissions Targets, raising the possibility that countries that fail to adopt strong emissions reduction programmes would face trade penalties from countries that do.
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Super fund accelerates race to carbon-neutral
Investor Daily
Tue 16 March, 2021
NGS Super has pledged to become carbon-neutral by the end of the decade, warning the 2050 goal a number of its rivals have sworn to is “misaligned” with science.
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Coles, Nestle in plans to build first-ever soft plastics recycling plant
The Sydney Morning Herald
Tue 16 March, 2021
A consortium of high-profile companies including Coles and Nestle is planning to build a soft plastics recycling plant where chocolate bar wrappers or chip bags can be broken down and remade into new food-safe wrappings.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Iron ore slips as China cracks down on pollution
The Australian Financial Review
Tue 16 March, 2021
A pollution crackdown in China’s rustbelt is starting to weigh on the price of iron ore, the steel-making ingredient that is the biggest generator of profits for leading miners.
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Switching off rooftop solar will become an important feature of a renewables grid
Reneweconomy
Tue 16 March, 2021
Australia’s biggest grid problems have traditionally been framed as one of matching supply and demand, with the focus on ensuring enough supply to meet the demand at any one point in time. But that network challenge is about to be turned on its head: the biggest problem in the future will be ensuring there is enough demand, because most consumers have their own supply in the form of rooftop solar.
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Inverters are solving grid issues at fraction of cost of spinning machines
Reneweconomy
Tue 16 March, 2021
The operators of four large scale solar farms in north Queensland have found that “tuning” their inverter settings has enabled them to solve “system strength” issues at a fraction of the cost of the current default mechanism – spinning machines.
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Lithium: Powering the Green Revolution
Cosmos
Tue 16 March, 2021
As the climate warms, sea levels rise and droughts, heatwaves and bushfires multiply, the need to usher in the green-energy future is increasingly urgent. But that doesn’t mean it can be done without significant challenges – not just in the economy (as it makes the changeover), but technologically and scientifically as well.
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Help the animals
The West Australian
Tue 16 March, 2021
Perth’s wildlife parks have been devastated by a year-long absence of foreign travellers, who normally flock to these centres to get up close to unique native animals like kangaroos and koalas. Tourists have been barred from entering Australia since March last year, creating financial black holes for privately-funded Perth attractions like Caversham Wildlife Park and Cohunu Koala Park.
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How barley growers are becoming carbon neutral
The Weekly Times
Tue 16 March, 2021
Growing demand for sustainable products has lead some barley producers to team up with a brewing giant to become carbon neutral.
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Mars Wrigley Working on Biodegradable Packaging
Food Processing
Tue 16 March, 2021
Sweets and snacks manufacturer Mars Wrigley and Danimer Scientific, a biodegradable material manufacturer, are working together to create more earth-friendly packaging options for the former's candy packaging.
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Looming Running Shoe ‘Environmental Catastrophe’ A Big Problem For Sportwear Industry
D'Marge
Tue 16 March, 2021
But our society’s growing obsession with sneakers comes at a huge environmental cost. Shoes stand out as one of the most CO2-intensive clothing items to make in the modern man’s wardrobe… And you tend to go through far more shoes than shirts and ties. For athletes, both amateur and professional alike, it’s an even greater concern, thanks to the increased rate of turnover.
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Significant rain for NSW, Qld for the next week, forecasters say
News.com.au
Tue 16 March, 2021
A wet and stormy week has been forecast for New South Wales and Queensland, with showers on Tuesday evening kicking off a long rain-soaked period.
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Perthnow
The Advertiser
The Australian
The Daily Telegraph
The Geelong Advertiser
The Mercury
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