Issue date : Wed 17 February, 2021
Estimated Reading Time : 03 Min 39 Seconds
Number of items : 43
Don’t cut farmers out: NSW, Victoria demand climate action role for agriculture
The Age
Wed 17 February, 2021
NSW and Victoria’s agriculture ministers are warning the federal Nationals Party that agriculture must be able to share in the economic opportunities of climate action, contradicting warnings from Morrison government MPs that the sector would suffer if its greenhouse emissions are capped.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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‘Permanent stain’: NSW seeks to allow new powerline in Kosciuszko park
The Sydney Morning Herald
Wed 17 February, 2021
The Berejiklian government wants to amend the management plan of the Kosciuszko National Park to permit new electricity transmission lines to be built, an act critics describe as “wilful vandalism”.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Water reform report’s big smile hides its big teeth: much more to do
The Sydney Morning Herald
Wed 17 February, 2021
A quick look at the Productivity Commission’s draft report on national water reform reminds me of the repeated judgment from old Mr Grace, the doddering owner of the department store in Are You Being Served? as he headed for the door: “You’ve all done very well!”
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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If net zero emissions cost one job, then I’m out
The Courier Mail
Wed 17 February, 2021
As a senator I will not vote for any policy, target, or “measure” that comes at a cost of Queensland jobs. Likewise, I won’t vote for anything that hurts businesses in Queensland which is why I am sceptical about the rush to net zero emissions by 2050.
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Pandemic brings ESG factors to the fore
Money Management
Wed 17 February, 2021
The pandemic has strengthened the role of responsible investing and, as a result, both investors and companies will face greater scrutiny over their environmental, social and governance (ESG) credentials, according to the study by First Sentier Investors.
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IBM plans to produce net-zero greenhouse emissions by 2030
Yahoo News
Wed 17 February, 2021
IBM’s operations won’t produce greenhouse emissions by the end of the decade. That’s the goal of the company’s latest climate pledge, in which, unlike some other companies, it emphasized the importance of preventing emissions before they occur. By 2025, IBM says it will reduce its greenhouse emissions by 65 percent compared to its output in 2010. “What's most important in the fight against climate change is to actually reduce emissions,” IBM said. “The company's net-zero goal is also accompanied by a specific, numerical target for residual emissions that are likely to remain after IBM has first done all it can across its operations to reduce.”
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Ausbil sustainable fund divests from fossil fuels
Money Management
Tue 16 February, 2021
Ausbil has announced that its Sustainable Equity fund will mark its three year anniversary formally excluding fossil fuels.
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Green infrastructure to cool western Sydney
Utility Magazine
Wed 17 February, 2021
The hottest and driest part of Greater Sydney will be smarter, cooler and greener under a new approach to planning and development led by Sydney Water.
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Victorian duck hunters save 181 wetlands but conservation work at risk
The Weekly Times
Wed 17 February, 2021
Duck hunters volunteer thousands of hours into rehabilitating Victoria’s 181 State Game Reserves. But that work could come to an abrupt end if the Andrews Government keeps cutting back the season and bag limits.
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Cadmium overload
Cosmos
Wed 17 February, 2021
Not everything in soil is good, and some trace elements – like cadmium – can be picked up by plants and transferred to humans as they eat.
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Plastic in the ocean kills more threatened albatrosses than we thought
The Conversation
Wed 17 February, 2021
Plastic in the ocean can be deadly for marine wildlife and seabirds around the globe, but our latest study shows single-use plastics are a bigger threat to endangered albatrosses in the southern hemisphere than we previously thought.
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Battle looms for Morrison over EU/G7 carbon border tax
The Fifth Estate
Tue 16 February, 2021
The UK and EU – and potentially the entire G7 – are on a collision course with Australia over trade measures to tackle climate change.
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Nats fear green lawfare may use loophole
The Australian
Tue 16 February, 2021
Nationals senators fear a parliamentary report has proposed a legislative ‘loophole’ exempting activist groups from a government crackdown on litigation funders.
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“Gas simply not low emissions”: Labor opposes Taylor’s CEFC power grab
Reneweconomy
Tue 16 February, 2021
The federal Labor opposition will seek to block many of the Morrison government’s proposed changes to the Clean Energy Finance Corporation that would see the green bank opened up to investments in fossil fuel projects, and would grant federal energy minister Angus Taylor new powers to direct its investments.
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UNSW to advise NSW government on how to use excess wind and solar
Reneweconomy
Tue 16 February, 2021
UNSW Sydney will lead a new research consortium that will advise the NSW government on the opportunities to foster new green fuel industries in the state, using excess solar and wind power.
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Peak insurance body drops support for Warragamba Dam wall raising
The Sydney Morning Herald
Tue 16 February, 2021
The Insurance Council of Australia has dropped its support for the Berejiklian government’s plan to lift the Warragamba Dam wall and called on it to find other ways to reduce downstream floodrisks in western Sydney.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Coal power stations going broke: Schott
The Australian Financial Review
Tue 16 February, 2021
Coal power stations are on track to close four or five years before the end of their rated life as plentiful renewable energy coming online makes them unprofitable, according to energy policy tsar Kerry Schott.
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The Australian
Solar pushing coal plants to early extinction says ESB’s Kerry Schott
NT News
The Advertiser
The Courier Mail
The Geelong Advertiser
The Gold Coast Bulletin
The Herald Sun
The Mercury
The Weekly Times
Tesla hikes price of Powerwall home battery, again, in Australia
Reneweconomy
Tue 16 February, 2021
Tesla has raised the retail price of the Powerwall 2 for the second time in four months, as demand for the 13.5 kWh home battery energy storage system continues to outstrip supply.
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Solar and battery hybrid to power Jabiru as uranium mining stops
Reneweconomy
Tue 16 February, 2021
Energy provider EDL has won a government contract to build a new power system – based around solar and battery storage – to supply the off-grid town of Jabiru in the Northern Territory, which is pinning its future on tourism and services.
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Treated timber and termites? Why bother and why not to bother
The Fifth Estate
Tue 16 February, 2021
Treated H2 timber framing is a time bomb with no benefit. The near-universal use of H2 blue, green or red framing timber in construction is now a time bomb for landfill in 20-40 years’ time. It cannot be composted nor recycled, and thus is sent to landfill. In an ideal world, buildings would be carefully deconstructed and every skerrick reused, but in the Land of Oz, where labourers are paid $55 per hour, and landfill rates are less than $200 per tonne that is just a pipe dream.
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Fracking 'risks NT groundwater ecology'
Yahoo News
Tue 16 February, 2021
More research is needed to ensure proposed gas fracking in the Northern Territory's Beetaloo Basin doesn't endanger tiny subterranean shrimp critical to groundwater health, a study has found.
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Perthnow
The Canberra Times
The Newcastle Herald
The West Australian
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