Issue date : Mon 18 January, 2021
Estimated Reading Time : 04 Min 25 Seconds
Number of items : 52
'Highly problematic for public trust': Australian political donations revealed
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 18 January, 2021
A surge in donations at the last federal election has taken the resource industry’s political payments to $136.8 million over two decades and a new analysis has named the sector as the biggest donor in Australian politics.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Why brumbies go where other invaders fear to tread
The Canberra Times
Mon 18 January, 2021
There was movement at the station, for the word had passed around, that the colt from old Regret had got away, and had joined the wild bush horses trampling the national park.
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'Nonsense': Top fund managers say insurers can withstand climate risks
The Age
Mon 18 January, 2021
Two of the country's most respected fund managers – Allen Gray managing director Simon Mawhinney and IML 's Anton Tagliaferro – have dismissed claims insurers are becoming un-investable due to growing risks of natural disasters caused by climate change.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
Major firms urge Japan to bolster 2030 renewables goal
Yahoo News
Mon 18 January, 2021
Major firms including Sony, Panasonic and Nissan on Monday urged the Japanese government to make its 2030 renewable energy target twice as ambitious.
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Australian seafood consumers urged to stop buying flake to protect sharks
The Guardian
Mon 18 January, 2021
Australian consumers will be encouraged not to purchase flake when they shop for seafood and to instead try sustainable alternatives in a new campaign that aims to put a spotlight on laws that permit the harvest of endangered sharks.
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'Paddington' bears tour crowd-free Machu Picchu
Yahoo News
Mon 18 January, 2021
Two members of South America's only bear species -- a mother and her cub -- have been spotted exploring the ruins of the Inca citadel of Machu Picchu, where tourist numbers have been restricted due to the pandemic.
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International Business Times
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Outdated Victorian environment laws failing wildlife: report
The Age
Sun 17 January, 2021
The killing of hundreds of wedge-tailed eagles in Gippsland and the deaths of dozens of koalas during the bulldozing of a plantation are two examples of how Victoria’s environment laws are failing to protect the state’s wildlife.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Nations failing to fund climate adaptation: UN
Yahoo News
Sun 17 January, 2021
The world is falling short of promises made under the Paris climate deal to help the most vulnerable nations deal with the increasingly devastating impacts of climate change, according to the United Nations.
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Inauguration Day marks a welcome opportunity to reset - and relax
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 17 January, 2021
A new era of Australia-US relations begins this week as Joe Biden is formally inaugurated as the 46th President of the world's wealthiest and most powerful country. After four volatile years of the Trump Administration, it is time to welcome a more enlightened agenda and, hopefully, a less erratic approach to global affairs from the US.
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Renewables transition means planning for coal plant closures now
The Age
Sun 17 January, 2021
If there’s one thing we’ve learned from the closure of coal power stations in Australia so far, it’s that the owners lie about the date. Back in 2016, the owner of Hazelwood power station insisted it would remain open until the 2030s. Instead, the last boiler was switched off in March 2017, giving workers and the community just five months’ notice.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
The biggest Coalition conspiracy theory is climate change denial
The Guardian
Sun 17 January, 2021
Nasa announced this week that 2020 – a year which included a La Niña event normally associated with lower temperatures – was the hottest year on record. It was also the week in which the Morrison government used racist tropes to distract and excuse conspiracy statements made by its MPs.
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What is the role of gas in a green economy?
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 17 January, 2021
In the second part of our series Future Power, we explain why the government wants more gas, and we ask, how clean is natural gas – and what is its future in Australia?
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Snowy Hydro boss eyes huge gas plant as coal closures approach
The Australian
Sun 17 January, 2021
The architect of the federal government’s $5.1bn Snowy 2.0 expansion is now lining up to build Australia’s largest gas power plant to ensure the lights stay on when the Liddell coal station starts to close its doors at the end of 2022.
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Nio, the ‘Chinese Tesla’ that has electrified investors worldwide
The Australian
Sun 17 January, 2021
When William Li, the founder and chief executive of Nio, decided that the electric car company’s mission statement should be “To shape a joyful lifestyle”, he probably wasn’t thinking about Britain’s twentysomethings happily punting on its share price to stave off boredom in lockdown.
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Melbourne Airport asks for powers to stop development underneath flight paths
The Age
Sun 17 January, 2021
Melbourne Airport has asked the state government for the right to block housing and other developments in areas affected by flight noise, as it fights to stop a Sydney Airport-style curfew being imposed on planes flying into Tullamarine.
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The Brisbane Times
The Newcastle Herald
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
Not out of the woods yet: Increased fires risk despite wet start to summer
The Age
Sun 17 January, 2021
NSW and Victoria are still facing increasing bushfire risks this summer due to the growing likelihood of severe grass fires, despite recent wet weather and the vast amount of fuel burnt out by the Black Summer blazes a year ago.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
Icon Water warn drier and hotter summers could put pressure on supplies
The Canberra Times
Sun 17 January, 2021
Following extreme temperatures and two of Australia's driest years on record, water storage levels across the ACT dropped below 45 per cent last summer, causing Icon Water to warn against impending water restrictions this time last year.
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US approves land swap for Rio Tinto mine
7 News
Sat 16 January, 2021
US government officials have approved a land swap for a Rio Tinto copper mine in Arizona that would boost domestic production of the red metal but destroy sites sacred to Native Americans.
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Perthnow
The Canberra Times
The Newcastle Herald
The West Australian
Yahoo News
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Sustainability bonds fuel ESG boom
The Australian Financial Review
Sat 16 January, 2021
As global financial markets gradually turn 'green' through an explosion in ESG fund inflows and green bond issues, investors can now buy an innovative bond designed to transform the world's dirtiest industries.
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Watchdog puts climate change warnings into action
The Australian
Sat 16 January, 2021
An internal briefing document to ASIC reveals the corporate regulator has been looking into company disclosures around climate change.
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Researchers turn the tide on sea level rise impacts
The Newcastle Herald
Sat 16 January, 2021
The research team believe the technology used at the Kooragang wetlands can be applied to other wetlands threatened by sea-level rise across the planet. "If applied globally, this method can protect high value coastal wetlands with similar environmental settings, including over 1,184,000 hectares of Ramsar coastal wetlands," the study paper says.
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Australian scientists probe ocean 'twilight zone'
7 News
Sat 16 January, 2021
Australian scientists are helping probe the ocean’s enigmatic ‘twilight zone’ which is home to strange creatures and crucial in the process of capturing carbon.
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Perthnow
The Canberra Times
The Newcastle Herald
The West Australian
Yahoo News
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Spice up your solar
Cosmos
Fri 15 January, 2021
Chilli is known to have a range of health benefits, from reducing infections to improving digestive performance. But here’s one you probably didn’t know: it appears a pinch of capsaicin – the chemical compound that gives chillies their spice – may also improve perovskite solar cells.
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Joe the pigeon's life spared after fake leg tag shows he's not from US
The Guardian
Fri 15 January, 2021
Australia’s Department of Agriculture has confirmed that Joe, a pigeon that was thought to have travelled to Australia from the US, is actually a fraud – a revelation that has saved his life.
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Birds that play with others have the biggest brains - and the same may go for humans
The Conversation
Fri 15 January, 2021
Have you ever seen magpies play-fighting with one another, or rolling around in high spirits? Or an apostlebird running at full speed with a stick in its beak, chased by a troop of other apostlebirds? Well, such play behaviour may be associated with a larger brain and a longer life.
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Animal magnetism is real
Cosmos
Fri 15 January, 2021
Franz Mesmer might have been on to something when he described animal magnetism as an invisible force possessed by all living things – at least, that seems to be the case with these snakes.
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75% of Australia’s marine protected areas are given only ‘partial’ protection. Here’s why that’s a problem
The Conversation
Fri 15 January, 2021
A global coalition of more than 50 countries have this week pledged to protect over 30% of the planet’s lands and seas by the end of this decade. Their reasoning is clear: we need greater protection for nature, to prevent further extinctions and protect the life-sustaining ecosystems crucial to human survival.
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Independent Australia
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