Issue date : Thu 19 November, 2020
Estimated Reading Time : 02 Min 43 Seconds
Number of items : 32
As Australia’s chief scientist, Alan Finkel brought more science into government. His successor Cathy Foley will continue the job
The Conversation
Thu 19 November, 2020
Australia’s chief scientist, Alan Finkel, will bring his five-year stint in the role to a close at the end of 2020. His successor will be Cathy Foley, a physicist and current chief scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), the national government research agency.
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Renters in Victoria soon won’t have to deal with dodgy heaters and insulation. Now other states must get energy-efficient
The Conversation
Thu 19 November, 2020
Renters will no longer have to contend with poorly insulated homes and Victoria will move closer towards 7-star home efficiency standards under a A$797 million plan announced this week. It’s purportedly the biggest energy efficiency scheme in any Australian state’s history.
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Petrol cars canned in UK ‘green revolution’
The Australian
Thu 19 November, 2020
Britain will ban the sale of petrol and diesel vehicles by 2030 as part of a “green industrial revolution” that will “transform living in the UK’’ and make it the first G7 country to decarbonise road transport.
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Don't sabotage free trade talks with a debate over climate change, Tony Abbott tells Britain
The Sydney Morning Herald
Thu 19 November, 2020
London: Tony Abbott has warned Britain against discussing climate change targets during free trade negotiations, and suggested a deal with Australia could be inked by Christmas if both sides agree to phase out tariffs rather than immediately eliminate them.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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PM's climate vision: 10 steps forward, 10 steps back?
Yahoo News
Thu 19 November, 2020
Prime Minister Boris Johnson's long-awaited climate plan includes hastening the end of petrol and diesel cars, new nuclear, hydrogen, and carbon capture. But as our Environment Analyst Roger Harrabin reports, other policies are leaving emissions untouched, or even driving them up.
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Could Australia adopt a UK-style conservative position on climate?
Reneweconomy
Thu 19 November, 2020
After a flurry of coverage of UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s “ten point” plan to act on climate change, mostly accompanied by bemusement that a conservative government could act so aggressively on climate, it’s worth pausing to consider exactly where it sits on the spectrum of ambition. The plan comprises of a broad mix of policy concepts, including offshore wind, hydrogen, electric vehicles, new nuclear plants, public transport, zero emissions aviation and shipping and carbon capture and storage.
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Core issues in water plan worth fighting for
The Weekly Times
Mon 30 November, -0001
The federal government must do more to address socio-economic challenges facing Basin communities, writes David McKenzie.
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'We do not deny climate change': Rupert Murdoch addresses son's exit from board
The Sydney Morning Herald
Thu 19 November, 2020
Rupert Murdoch has made his first public comments about the abrupt resignation of his son James Murdoch from News Corporation's board, rejecting assertions the company denies climate change or that he did not consider his son's point of view.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
Don’t rely on off-the-shelf ESG ratings, warn experts
Investment Magazine
Thu 19 November, 2020
Measuring the strength of a company’s ESG characteristics is becoming an increasingly important part of investors’ assessing of risk and return, with consumers and policymakers increasingly applying pressure for greater sustainability, and a rising body of systemic evidence pointing to a correlation between the ESG characteristics of companies and their forward return performance.
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How did mercury get down there?
Cosmos
Thu 19 November, 2020
Mercury has been found in the deepest part of the Earth’s oceans, the 11,000-metre-deep Mariana Trench in the northwest Pacific. But how did it get there?
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Here’s how a smart field-to-fork network could revolutionise our food system
The Mandarin
Thu 19 November, 2020
In May the EU revealed its new Field to Fork strategy, a comprehensive plan to overhaul food production at every stage to make it more resilient and environmentally friendly. Its success would make the EU a global leader in sustainability, helping to protect its food supply from threats such as climate change and pandemics. For that to happen, however, we need to see an even more fundamental change: a conversion of the current, fragmented tangle of food supply chains into a coherent and traceable supply network.
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Miner resilience to be tested as La Niña looms
Australian Mining
Thu 19 November, 2020
As the saying goes, “time and tide wait for no man”, so you should jump at an opportunity when it presents itself because nature continues regardless of our plans and preferences.
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Deputy Premier Barilaro intervenes to stop new 'koala wars' outbreak
The Sydney Morning Herald
Wed 18 November, 2020
NSW's koala wars have taken another twist with Nationals leader John Barilaro forced to intervene to reverse unsanctioned changes to a bill introduced by one of his senior colleagues that threatened to detonate divisions within the Coalition government.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Gas-fired recovery a massive employment dud
The Newcastle Herald
Wed 18 November, 2020
A gas-fired recovery from the economic damage caused by COVID-19 will not help the Hunter. In fact, a gas-fired recovery will struggle to employ anyone, except the gas executives who proposed the idea.
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Unprecedented home energy efficiency pledge unveiled in Victoria, but is it enough?
The Fifth Estate
Wed 18 November, 2020
A long-overdue investment to raise the energy efficiency of homes in Victoria has denoted the state a “clear leader” in climate solutions, but a climate change think tank has called on the government to aim even higher – for net-zero all-electric homes.
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What is climate change? A really simple guide
Yahoo News
Wed 18 November, 2020
While Covid-19 has shaken much of human society, the threat posed by global warming has not gone away. Human activities have increased carbon dioxide emissions, driving up temperatures. Extreme weather and melting polar ice are among the possible effects.
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Three more Australian companies put on notice over emissions
The Australian Financial Review
Wed 18 November, 2020
Climate Action 100+, a group of the world's largest institutional investors, has put on notice another three Australian companies – Oil Search, Orica and Incitec Pivot – demanding they develop and publish plans to reduce their carbon emissions to net zero.
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The Australian
Aussie firms on climate hit-list
Small steps taken to make shipping greener
Yahoo News
Wed 18 November, 2020
Delegates at a high-level meeting have agreed new guidelines intended to make shipping compatible with UN climate change goals.
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AustralianSuper net-zero promise flawed: MarketForces
Financial Standard
Wed 18 November, 2020
AustralianSuper's promise to go net-zero in carbon emissions by 2050 fails to "match, let alone improve on" what its peer funds are doing, says MarketForces.
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Victoria’s massive social housing spend is a win for sustainability
The Fifth Estate
Wed 18 November, 2020
This week the Victorian Government unveiled a “big housing build” plan set to “transform the social housing system”, finally heeding calls from the housing sector to address the sharp rise in cost of living pressures and energy affordability.
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Environmental impact docos - a playlist
ProBono Australia News
Wed 18 November, 2020
Using film as a tool to create impact is a relatively new concept, but one that is being used increasingly and to great effect. Documentary Australia Foundation has been championing the use of storytelling to drive social change for over 12 years. Here, we give you the rundown on some of the most powerful environment and climate change documentaries – and a sneak peek into what is around the corner.
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Triple-typhoon hit leaves trail of destruction
The Sydney Morning Herald
Wed 18 November, 2020
Manila: Three strong typhoons over the past three weeks have killed more than 100 people in the Philippines and damaged farms and infrastructure worth almost 25 billion pesos ($710 million), based on reports from its disaster agency.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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