Issue date : Fri 16 October, 2020
Estimated Reading Time : 04 Min 14 Seconds
Number of items : 50
Friday essay: crafting a link to deep time from ancient river red gum
The Conversation
Fri 16 October, 2020
With a mischievous smile, Damien Wright gives the exhibit an unceremonious kick. The enormous, curved slab of river red gum rocks back and forth on the gallery floor, casting a wavering shadow over the “Do Not Touch” sign at its base.
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Environmental credential labels could be compulsory in EU by 2022
Farm Weekly
Fri 16 October, 2020
Within a couple of years, products for sale in the European Union could be required to include a label that provides consumers with an assessment of the product's environmental credentials, and this could provide both risks and opportunities for wool.
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Strong momentum for Munro climate change theme
Money Management
Fri 16 October, 2020
Munro’s climate change theme focuses on clean energy, batteries, building efficiency, and packaging, water and waste as it believes the sector is becoming more important than ever since COVID-19.
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388 George Street delivers sustainability first
Architecture and Design
Fri 16 October, 2020
Brookfield Properties and Oxford Investa Property Partners (OIPP) have set a new benchmark for sustainability in Australia, pioneering the recycling of office workstations at its $200 million 388 George Street redevelopment in Sydney’s CBD.
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'Your little patch of bush': Sharing Melbourne with endangered animals
The Age
Fri 16 October, 2020
It was a musical chattering, mixed with deeper, mellow notes, that stopped Michael Livingston dead in his tracks as he was leaving Royal Park on a cool August evening.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Honeybee ID is a gut feeling
Cosmos
Fri 16 October, 2020
Bee sisters are genetically closer than human sisters, so it’s easy to assume this is why they recognise each other.
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Restore ecosystems to prevent extinctions
Cosmos
Thu 15 October, 2020
Restoring just under a third of Earth’s ecosystems to their natural state could protect more than two-thirds of land-based mammals, amphibians and birds at risk of extinction while soaking up 465 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide, according to a new report.
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A department store that rents clothes? It's not as mad as it sounds
The Sydney Morning Herald
Fri 16 October, 2020
It sounds like the wildest proposition. Take the traditional department store model, which was built on selling new clothes each season, and give customers an alternative, in which they don't buy anything at all.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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The post-Covid sales pitch: Repair, repurpose, resell
Inside Retail
Thu 15 October, 2020
Faced with uncertainty, many customers are putting off buying what they already have and starting to rethink what they really need. As purchasing becomes more considered, the retail landscape is becoming more competitive.
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These Upcycled, Sustainable Designer Bags Are Honestly Better Than the Real Thing
PopSugar
Fri 16 October, 2020
Chiara Rivituso and Matteo Bastiani are the designer duo behind Camera 60, for which they develop leather goods based out of Milan. But once Chiara and Matteo adjusted to their life in lockdown, they decided to refocus their efforts on sustainability in an incredibly smart, stylish way. They caught the eye of fans, designers, and influencers by re-imageing iconic luxury handbags with upcycled materials — including everything from an Oreo cookie box to an Amazon Prime envelope.
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SUVs targeted in new French 'weight tax'
Yahoo News
Thu 15 October, 2020
France will impose a new weight tax on heavy cars and sport utility vehicles as part of a plan to get automakers to reduce CO2 emissions, Environment Minister Barbara Pompili said Thursday.
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International Business Times
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Tenth of COVID-19 stimulus money could help world reach climate targets
The Sydney Morning Herald
Thu 15 October, 2020
The world could get on track to avert catastrophic climate change by investing a tenth of a planned $US12 trillion ($16.9 trillion) in pandemic recovery packages in reducing dependence on fossil fuels, climate scientists say.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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China's power game puts the pressure on Australian coal
The Sydney Morning Herald
Thu 15 October, 2020
With China committing to reach net zero emissions before 2060, a timeline and a plan has been set for the curtain call on fossil fuels. As China is the largest carbon dioxide emitter and the largest fossil fuel importer, its actions reverberate globally. And with the China-Australia relationship at a low-ebb it looks like Australia’s thermal and coking coal exports to China could be taking an early hit.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Australia should reassess climate reputation: AusSuper chair
Investor Daily
Thu 15 October, 2020
The chair of AustralianSuper has cautioned Australia should be re-evaluating its global position as an exporter and emitter, as other countries seek to protect themselves against climate change.
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APRA executive calls for Australia to increase investment in natural disaster mitigation
The Mandarin
Thu 15 October, 2020
The billions of dollars spent annually on cleaning up the damage caused by bushfires, floods and other natural disasters would be better spent on mitigation and hazard-reduction measures, according to Australian Prudential Regulation Authority executive board member Geoff Summerhayes.
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WSAA paper shows water utilities’ role in a circular economy
Utility Magazine
Thu 15 October, 2020
The Water Services Association of Australia (WSAA) has published a new paper titled Transitioning the water industry with the circular economy, outlining water utilities’ role in the circular economy.
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AustralianSuper chair warns companies vulnerable to EU carbon tax
The Australian Financial Review
Thu 15 October, 2020
Australia should be worried about the European Union strengthening its protectionist resolve to levy carbon taxes on imports from “free rider” countries seen to be failing to aggressively cut carbon emissions, warns AustralianSuper chairman Don Russell.
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World Energy Outlook 2020: COVID-19 response to mould the future of energy
Energy Magazine
Thu 15 October, 2020
The International Energy Agency (IEA) has published its World Energy Outlook 2020, which outlines how governments’ responses to the volatility of 2020 will impact efforts to accelerate clean energy transitions and reach international energy and climate goals.
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Queensland shift to 100 per cent renewables feasible within 15-years
Reneweconomy
Thu 15 October, 2020
Queensland could shift to an electricity system powered entirely by renewable energy sources within the next 15 years, with most of the necessary projects already in the development pipeline, a new analysis has found.
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IKEA embarks on mega grid-firming clean energy project in Adelaide
The Fifth Estate
Thu 15 October, 2020
To power its Adelaide store and support the South Australian power grid, IKEA, in partnership with Planet Ark Power, has launched its Australian-first clean energy storage initiative, with construction now underway on the grid-connected commercial microgrid.
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Aussie compressed ‘zero carbon’ hydrogen transport ship unveiled
Reneweconomy
Thu 15 October, 2020
Australian marine transportation company Global Energy Ventures has unveiled a new compressed hydrogen ship design which it claims will be able to store up to 2,000 tonnes of compressed hydrogen for marine transport.
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State-owned utilities to tap into salt and waste water
The Australian Financial Review
Thu 15 October, 2020
State-owned water providers expect greater investment in de-salinisation and recycling infrastructure in the face of climate change and in the fallout from one of Australia’s worst droughts.
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WATER: How does NSW make sure it doesn’t get so close to Day Zero again?
The Fifth Estate
Thu 15 October, 2020
According to one of the authors of a new report the focus on water in NSW has traditionally been on centralised infrastructure that utilities want to build rather than water efficiency. But what saved us during the Millennium Drought was the citizens, not utilities. Nor was it the winding back of the BASIX sustainability index that some quarters advocate.
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NTCRS expansion would bring national benefits
Inside Waste
Thu 15 October, 2020
Significant nationwide benefits would be generated from an expansion of the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS) to include all electronic and electrical equipment (EEE), according to a new report.
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7 Easy Ways To Be Friendlier To The Planet Without Being Unfriendly To Your Wallet
Pedestrian
Thu 15 October, 2020
The planet has felt borderline apocalyptic recently, right? I mean, here in Aus we started the year with fire, moved onto flood, watched habitats disappear and a virus take over. Greta Thunberg is crying, koalas are dying, and we’re stuck at home using waaaay too much (not super sustainable) laundry detergent in an effort to both literally and metaphorically clean up our lives – can we please just do something about climate change already?
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