Issue date : Fri 11 September, 2020
Estimated Reading Time : 03 Min 29 Seconds
Number of items : 41
South Australia's ban on single-use plastic cutlery and straws hailed as 'historic'
The Guardian
Fri 11 September, 2020
South Australia has become the first Australian state to introduce laws banning some single-use plastics including cutlery, straws and stirrers.
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GQ Australia
South Australia Could Ban Single-Use Plastics By 2021 With Historic Laws
News.com.au
Single-use plastics banned in South Australia: Queensland could be next
The Australian
The Courier Mail
The Daily Telegraph
The Herald Sun
Spare the wilderness, cull the brumbies
The Canberra Times
Fri 11 September, 2020
Binalong's favourite adopted son, "Banjo" Paterson, has got a lot to answer for. Ever since the bush bard first published his The Man From Snowy River in The Bulletin 130 years ago the wild horse, or "brumby", has occupied a special place in the Australian psyche.
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Rio Tinto boss JS Jacques steps down
The Australian Financial Review
Fri 11 September, 2020
Rio Tinto chief executive Jean-Sebastien Jacques will exit the company along with two of the senior executives deemed to be partially responsible for the destruction of prized indigenous heritage in Western Australia's Juukan Gorge.
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BHP forms heritage body after being given permission to destroy at least 40 Aboriginal sites
The Guardian
Fri 11 September, 2020
BHP has established a heritage advisory council with Banjima native title holders to inform the design of its $4.5bn South Flank iron ore mining operation, just three months after the mining giant received government permission to destroy at least 40 sites against the wishes of the Banjima people.
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BHP executives face carbon test
The Australian
Fri 11 September, 2020
BHP executives face carbon test BHP boss Mike Henry will put 10 per cent of his leadership teams bonus payments on the line over the mining giants plan to reduce its carbon emissions by 30 per cent by 2030, as the company outlines its approach to dealing with its contribution to climate change over the next decade.
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Crossbench senators vow to block Coalition changes to environment laws
The Guardian
Thu 10 September, 2020
Crossbench senators have vowed to block the Morrison government’s proposed changes to environmental laws next month, in part because they include nothing to improve the protection of Australia’s ailing wildlife and natural heritage.
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Climate policy pressure builds as Steggall sets November date for zero emissions bill
Reneweconomy
Thu 10 September, 2020
Independent federal MP Zali Steggall looks set to resume her bid to hold the Morrison government to account on climate change, setting a November date for the tabling of legislation that proposes to set a national policy framework based on a bipartisan target of net-zero emissions by 2050.
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Climate clash over potential gas emissions
Yahoo News
Thu 10 September, 2020
The Morrison government's push for a gas-fired economic recovery from coronavirus has environmentalists and the petroleum industry butting heads.
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Perthnow
The Canberra Times
The Newcastle Herald
The West Australian
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My colleague Barilaro's koala claims are a pack of mistruths: Stokes fires back
The Sydney Morning Herald
Thu 10 September, 2020
John Barilaro said a lot of things about the koala policy on Thursday, and most of them are untrue. My colleague in the NSW government said farmers can’t build a feed shed or a driveway on their property without a koala study. This is not the case. You can erect farm sheds, pour driveways, clear fence lines and engage in any routine agricultural practice that has occurred for generations without the need for development consent or a koala study.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Mike Henry makes a clear carbon case
The Australian Financial Review
Thu 10 September, 2020
The boss of steel giant's climate change argument is simple. The world will need more of what BHP produces, and BHP is best placed to deliver it as cleanly as possible.
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BHP's $1.3b of climate projects more important than dividends
The Australian Financial Review
Thu 10 September, 2020
BHP will spend up to $US1 billion ($1.37 billion) over the next five years to achieve its new emissions reduction targets and indicated the investment required to achieve the targets would rank above dividends on its list of spending priorities.
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Harvest Road to cut carbon emissions
Farm Weekly
Thu 10 September, 2020
WESTERN Australia's largest beef processor, Harvest Road Group (HRG), is seeking to better understand how the beef industry can achieve the industry's carbon neutral goal by 2030.
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Ninety per cent of Australian consumers want sustainable products
The Fifth Estate
Thu 10 September, 2020
Nine in 10 Australian consumers are more likely to purchase ethical and sustainable products according to new research, with the survey also revealing that 85 per cent of consumers want retailers and brands to be more transparent about the sustainability of their products.
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Hobsons Bay rolls out first virtual power plant
The Fifth Estate
Thu 10 September, 2020
Hobsons Bay City Council has taken a big step towards its net zero carbon ambitions with a large-scale roll out of its Virtual Power Plant (VPP) and the installation of new solar panels across more than 40 council-owned buildings.
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Why joining up two Brisbane office buildings was a good idea
The Fifth Estate
Thu 10 September, 2020
In an impressive engineering exercise, two office buildings in Brisbane were recently stitched together, maintaining much of the existing fabric while creating expansive floor plates for prospective tenants. It was challenging for the architects, Fender Katsalidis, and for the engineers Inertia Engineering. But the results will be a more sustainable product.
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Landcom’s patterns for cooling the commons in Western Sydney
The Fifth Estate
Thu 10 September, 2020
The heat is on for Western Sydney in more ways than one. Not only is the region expected to regularly hit 50 degrees in summer, it’s already done so. And yet it’s earmarked for major expansion of population.
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Researchers reveal trick to stop seagulls stealing your food
News.com.au
Thu 10 September, 2020
There’s nothing more frustrating than having your lunch attacked by a bunch of seagulls, but there is now a simple solution to end the scavenging.
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The Advertiser
The Herald Sun
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Think 2020's disasters are wild? Experts see worse in future
9 News
Thu 10 September, 2020
A record amount of California is burning, spurred by a nearly 20-year mega-drought. To the north, parts of Oregon that don't usually catch fire are in flames. Meanwhile, the Atlantic's 16th and 17th named tropical storms are swirling, a record number for this time of year.
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'Victim' of toxic waste dumping syndicate says it could be driven to wall by EPA
The Age
Thu 10 September, 2020
A Melbourne storage company says it will be forced to the wall by an Environment Protection Authority order requiring it to spend more than $1 million to clean up a huge stockpile of mislabelled toxic waste transferred to it under false pretences.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Australia Post gets behind e-waste disposal scheme
Inside Waste
Thu 10 September, 2020
In response to the issue of unwanted electronic and electrical goods service disposal, a national e-waste shipping solution has been developed in partnership with Australia Post.
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7 Sustainable Swimwear Brands You Need To Know About
GQ Australia
Thu 10 September, 2020
As the days lengthen and thoughts of sand and sun begin to percolate in the national consciousness - appropriately socially distanced please - we are also forced to contemplate the very health of the body of water we are diving into. At least we should. Many Australian urban beaches are cleaner than they’ve ever been and an increasing number of sunscreen manufacturers are eschewing the oxybenzones that cause reef damage.
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