Issue date : Thu 9 April, 2020
Estimated Reading Time : 02 Min 22 Seconds
Number of items : 28
From the bushfires to coronavirus, our old ‘normal’ is gone forever. So what’s next?
The Conversation
Thu 9 April, 2020
The world faces profound disruption. For Australians who lived through the most horrific fire season on record, there has been no time to recover. The next crisis is now upon us in the form of COVID-19. As we grapple with uncertainty and upheaval, it’s clear that our old “normal” will never be recovered.
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COVID-19’S extraordinary opportunities are on offer
The Fifth Estate
Thu 9 April, 2020
In the short term, the COVID-19 pandemic has stalled the climate action momentum that was growing in Australia following the disastrous 2019/20 bushfire season.
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Renewable energy jobs in Australia surge to record levels
The Age
Thu 9 April, 2020
Employment in Australia's renewable energy sector surged nearly 30 per cent to its highest-ever level following a boom in wind and solar power construction activity in 2018-19.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Product-to-product heat recovery
Food & Beverage
Thu 9 April, 2020
Wastewater, sewage, effluents and sludge are useful sources of energy with the potential to heat (or in some circumstances cool) other products or materials in industrial processes. The DTR Series of double-tube heat exchangers from HRS is designed to maximise direct (product-to-product) energy recovery from such low viscosity materials, allowing valuable heat to be recaptured before the effluent enters final treatment or is discharged to the environment.
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Wildlife exploitation = infectious disease risk
Cosmos
Thu 9 April, 2020
Zoonotic diseases – those transmitted from animals to humans – are quickly becoming one of the world’s biggest public health challenges, according to new research published, with impeccable timing, in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
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How some flowers recover from injury
Cosmos
Thu 9 April, 2020
Some flowers have a remarkable capacity to pick themselves up – literally – after an accident, according to a study published in the journal New Phytologist.
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Making the most of PET recycling
Food & Beverage
Thu 9 April, 2020
Martogg is a family-owned business founded in 1975. It has grown to employ hundreds of people and is a company that specialises in resins and recycled products for the plastics industry. With its head office in Melbourne, and branches around Australia, it is truly a national company that offers solutions for companies that require commodity resins, engineering materials, colours and additives and recycled products.
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Climate change could shrink fish sizes
Food Processing
Wed 8 April, 2020
An IMAS-led study has revealed that global climate change will affect fish sizes in unpredictable ways and consequently impact complex food webs in our oceans. The study analysed three decades of data from 30,000 surveys of rocky and coral reefs around Australia, confirming that changes in water temperature were responsible for driving changes in average sizes of fish species across time and spatial scales. The findings from the study were published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.
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Los Angeles air 'cleanest in world' since COVID-19
9 News
Wed 8 April, 2020
When you think of the US city of Los Angeles' skyline, the vision is one obscured by smog, with thick air pollution hanging over its downtown buildings.
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NSW lobby group slams Queensland's 'ramshackle' recycling scheme
The Brisbane Times
Wed 8 April, 2020
Queensland’s Containers for Change scheme should be immediately audited after a survey in February found that of 129 collection points, 14 did not exist or were closed and 35 were not effective, a Sydney-based national environment group says.
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The Age
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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