Issue date : Mon 16 March, 2020
Estimated Reading Time : 02 Min 43 Seconds
Number of items : 32
More green, more ‘zzzzz’? Trees may help us sleep
The Conversation
Mon 16 March, 2020
Not feeling sharp? Finding it hard to concentrate? About 12-19% of adults in Australia regularly don’t get enough sleep, defined as less than 5.5-6 hours each night. But who’d have thought the amount of tree cover in their neighbourhood could be a factor? Our latest research has found people with ample nearby green space are much more likely to get enough sleep than people in areas with less greenery.
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Scientists find burnt, starving koalas weeks after the bushfires
The Conversation
Mon 16 March, 2020
The plight of koalas during the recent bushfire crisis made headlines here and abroad. But the emergency for our wildlife is not over. Koalas that survived the flames are now dying from starvation, dehydration, smoke inhalation and other hazards.
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Reducing land fill: Racing to recycle
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 16 March, 2020
Australia’s ambitious plan to ban the exportation of plastics, paper, glass and tyres by June 2020 has spurred entrepreneurial minds into action.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Risk and reward in decarbonising NSW economy, says chief scientist
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 15 March, 2020
Shifting NSW's $600 billion economy towards net zero carbon emissions will generate many opportunities as new industries emerge, but also require careful policy co-ordination and communication.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Fears threatened species at risk with State set to miss protected land target
The Courier Mail
Sun 15 March, 2020
There are fears threatened species will be placed at risk with the State Government set to miss its 2020 to lock up protected land. THE State Government looks set to miss its 2020 target to lock up protected land, sparking fears many threatened species will be placed at risk.
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NT News
The Advertiser
The Herald Sun
The Mercury
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Fukushima nine years on: Warnings for Australia
Independent Australia
Sun 15 March, 2020
The anniversary of the Australian uranium-fuelled Fukushima nuclear disaster is no time to open the door to an expanded nuclear industry in Australia, writes Dave Sweeney.
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ENVIRONMENT: Some more size and bag limit issues...
Fishing World
Sun 15 March, 2020
THE more you look at size and bag limits as appropriate management tools the more questions pop up. Consider two popular East Coast sportfish, the luderick and the rock blackfish. They’re close relatives, both Girella species, but their issues couldn’t be more different. Yet the recreational management measures are very similar in NSW. The luderick has a bag limit of 10 and a minimum size limit of 27cm, while the rock blackfish has 10 and 30cm. But that’s about where the similarities end.
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'Grand old dame' to get elephant companions after circus life
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 15 March, 2020
In the 10 years since Saigon retired from a long circus career, the female elephant has had little companionship save a flock of sheep, a donkey, a miniature pony, and lately, three water buffaloes named Larry, Curly and Moe.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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“Super kelp” adapts to increasing temperatures
The Mercury
Sun 15 March, 2020
Researchers from the University of Tasmania’s Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) have identified several strains of giant kelp with “super” powers to adapt to changing temperatures. | The Mercury Colonies of tiny super kelp off Tasmania are helping scientists find a global remedy for habitat loss caused by climate change.
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Think before you flush: the fatbergs clogging up Canberra
The Canberra Times
Sun 15 March, 2020
In 2012, when Rob Allen was relatively new to the water and waste game, he was called to the Dickson shops to find sewage spilling out from below the street onto footpaths and roads.
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Cars that eat paradise
ABC News
Sun 15 March, 2020
While known for pristine beaches and blue skies, Pacific Islands are also polluted with thousands of man-made monuments: rusting cars, trucks and other wreckage.
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Christiana Figueres's superpower could save the planet
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 14 March, 2020
Optimism seems like sheer folly in many ways, especially today. The optimism of political leaders too often is deceptive and self-serving, more rooted in denial and ignorance than hope as they choke on smoke: “Climate change? Nothing to see here! Just the same old cataclysmic events as ever!” How can we be optimistic about a future in a world of flaming coastlines, disappearing species, smoke-dense CBDs, shelves emptied of basics like toilet paper and looming global recession?
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Bushfire recovery a priority for COAG
The Australian
Fri 13 March, 2020
Government leaders will ramp up the bushfire recovery effort in the wake of a catastrophic summer, endorsing a national risk ­reduction framework to build ­resilience and improve responses to natural disasters.
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WMRR makes urgent appeal for national framework
Inside Waste
Fri 13 March, 2020
On the eve of COAG, the Waste Management and Resource Recovery Association of Australia (WMRR) has called for a national infrastructure plan along with a complementary and transparent funding program. WMRR believes that this will ensure the success of the approaching national waste export bans, and boost Australia’s economy.
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Victoria gets moving with household rubbish transformation
Inside Waste
Fri 13 March, 2020
Driven by the Victorian Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group (MWRRG), in partnership with sixteen councils, the largest tender for new waste management infrastructure has begun. It’s also the first collective tender on behalf of councils for an alternative solution to landfill.
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