Issue date : Tue 11 February, 2020
Estimated Reading Time : 03 Min 54 Seconds
Number of items : 46
All talk, no action: only three nations meet climate deadline
The Australian
Tue 11 February, 2020
Only three countries, representing 0.1 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions, have met a Paris Agreement deadline to lodge new plans to boost action on climate change.
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February rainfall proves a boon for all
The Canberra Times
Tue 11 February, 2020
While there is no doubt it is always possible to have too much of a good thing, the heavy falls of rain recorded across the eastern seaboard in the last 48 hours have done far more good than harm.
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Q&A recap: business council calls for legislated target of net zero emissions by 2050
The Guardian
Tue 11 February, 2020
Jennifer Westacott, the BCA chief, tells audience Australia should aim to meet 2030 targets without using Kyoto carryover credits
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The Australian
Q&A: Jennifer Westacott backs Zali Steggall’s proposed climate bill
9 News
Industry hopeful for end to climate wars
The Newcastle Herald
7 News
Perthnow
The Canberra Times
Yahoo News
The Australian Financial Review
'Important starting point': BCA backs Zali Steggall climate plan
How viruses adapt from animals to humans
Cosmos
Tue 11 February, 2020
As the novel coronavirus death toll mounts, it is natural to worry. How far will this virus travel through humanity, and could another such virus arise seemingly from nowhere?
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When introduced species are cute and loveable, culling them is a tricky proposition
The Conversation
Tue 11 February, 2020
Almost one in five Australians think introduced horses and foxes are native to Australia, and others don’t want “cute” or “charismatic” animals culled, even when they damage the environment. So what are the implications of these attitudes as we help nature recover from bushfires?
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Himalayan glacier shows evidence of Industrial Revolution
Cosmos
Tue 11 February, 2020
A new study, published in the journal PNAS, has found that by-products of burning coal in Europe in the late 18th century made their way to the Dasuopu glacier, which is 7200 metres above sea level on Shishapangma, the world’s 14th highest mountain.
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Tropical forests struggle to recover from El Niño
Cosmos
Tue 11 February, 2020
The extreme weather patterns of the 2015-16 El Niño, among the worst since the 1950s, had crippling ripple effects around the globe, from drastic crop failures, food shortages and disease outbreaks to destructive wildfires and severe coral bleaching.
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Coalition compares wind and solar to “dole bludgers”, pushes for coal, nuclear
Reneweconomy
Mon 10 February, 2020
The wind and solar industries are bracing for another verbal assault and an extended period of policy indifference from the federal government, after a senior Coalition MP likened renewable energy to “dole bludgers’, the government funnelled $4 million into a study for a new coal fired power station in Queensland, and so-called government “moderates” declared their support for nuclear.
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Canavan goes: Leaves 10,000-year toxic legacy
Independent Australia
Mon 10 February, 2020
Matt Canavan has resigned the Resources Ministry, but the radioactive waste he signed off on has up to another 10,000 years in office, writes Dave Sweeney.
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Two moderate Liberal MPs say government should not back new coal plants
The Guardian
Mon 10 February, 2020
Two moderate Liberals have declared the Morrison government should not underwrite a new coal-fired power station, as the trade minister Simon Birmingham has acknowledged the Coalition has already signed up to a net zero carbon emissions target “for the world” by 2050.
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Climate row fuels split as Barnaby Joyce flexes muscle
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 10 February, 2020
A shock defeat for the Morrison government has heightened tensions over climate change after angry Nationals defied their leaders to back a Queensland rebel for a key position in Parliament, signalling another spill against Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Zali Steggall proposes new climate change bill as argument over coal-fired power divides government again
News.com.au
Mon 10 February, 2020
Former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull returned to parliament today, and promptly hit the party he once led with some harsh words.
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Teachers biased on history, climate change, sex: Pauline Hanson
The Canberra Times
Mon 10 February, 2020
One Nation Senator Pauline Hanson will introduce a bill on Monday that seeks to end the "indoctrination" of children in schools - across a broad swathe of topics from climate change to non-traditional sex.
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$100 million a year to keep half of Liddell coal-fired power plant alive
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 10 February, 2020
Extending the life of just half of the Liddell coal-fired power station would cost as much as $100 million a year and, even then, technical issues would cloud the reliability of the ageing plant.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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'Divestment is simplistic': Cbus backs 23 coal producers
The Age
Mon 10 February, 2020
The $56 billion superannuation fund representing the construction and building industries has invested in at least 23 global coalmining companies despite adopting a vocal stance on climate change and pledging to reduce exposure to fossil fuels.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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New Brisbane passive house designed to fight against climate change
Architecture and Design
Mon 10 February, 2020
Vanquish is a ground-breaking passive house project being built by the Brisbane-based property development company, Solaire Properties to demonstrate the future of housing while mitigating climate change.
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Buildings kill millions of birds. Here’s how to reduce the toll
The Conversation
Tue 11 February, 2020
As high-rise cities grow upwards and outwards, increasing numbers of birds die by crashing into glass buildings each year. And of course many others break beaks, wings and legs or suffer other physical harm. But we can help eradicate the danger by good design.
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The double-eyed fig parrot is Australia’s tiniest parrot
Australian Geographic
Mon 10 February, 2020
At just 14 cm long from beak to tail, the double-eyed fig parrot is a diminutive little guy with a disproportionately large head and gorgeous colours on its face.
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'Critical' few hours for Sydney beach erosion as storm heads south
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 10 February, 2020
Sydney's beaches - and many along the NSW coast - will endure further erosion as the huge storm battering the eastern parts of the state shifts southwards.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Sydney's storage levels surge by more than half after huge rain event
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 10 February, 2020
Sydney's dam levels may increase by as much as 30 percentage points from the recent deluge, erasing more than a year's decline in a single rain event, and also placing in doubt the need for water restrictions for the city.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
Working to reduce an ocean of plastic
The Australian
Mon 10 February, 2020
Environmentally conscious corporations, such as SAP Ariba, are developing sustainable business practices to cut the use of plastic.
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The most stylish celebrities put sustainability first at the 2020 Oscars
Vogue Australia
Mon 10 February, 2020
The annual Academy Awards arguably represent the biggest night in Hollywood film history, and it’s easy to get swept up in the excitement. First founded in 1929 by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Academy Awards is an evening of celebration, where film buffs old and new come together to recognise the brightest talents in Hollywood’s top tier.
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Harper Bazaar
The Biggest Trend Of The Oscars? Rewearing Old Gowns
Sydney mops up after big rain as another 'intense weather' event looms
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 10 February, 2020
Tens of thousands of people remain without power, rail lines face ongoing disruptions, Sydney's dam levels have jumped by more than half and beaches have retreated as much as 25 metres amid the wettest weather since 1990.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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