Issue date : Mon 20 January, 2020
Estimated Reading Time : 05 Min 41 Seconds
Number of items : 67
Climate change: Morrison facing new action calls from colleagues
The Daily Telegraph
Mon 20 January, 2020
Prime Minister Scott Morrison could be facing a cabinet revolt on climate change with the horror bushfire season sparking new calls for action from his own top-ranking MPs.
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The Gold Coast Bulletin
The Herald Sun
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Climate change impossible to deny
The Canberra Times
Mon 20 January, 2020
Is it possible that even if the earth was reduced to a burnt out husk and the last humans were sheltering in the deepest caves they could find there would still be a climate change denier up the back saying "it wasn't us, it's just the natural order of things"?
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What must fire our national conversation
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 20 January, 2020
So, when can we stop talking about the bushfires? Both the Coalition and the Labor Party will be asking themselves that question by now. Already, you can feel the voracious hunger for news – a hunger to which political parties are deeply, viscerally attuned – subsiding. Not gone yet, but going.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Time to come out of the wilderness on bushfires and cut back the fuel
The Australian
Mon 20 January, 2020
The outlook is grim for Scott Morrison’s regime in the minds of his opponents. Having declared the bushfire season to be the Prime Minister’s “Chernobyl moment”, his Berlin Wall moment surely is not far away.
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Australia has a real future as a renewables superpower
The Canberra Times
Mon 20 January, 2020
Amid almost daily complaints from industry about skyrocketing electricity costs, out dropped an announcement recently so counter to the dominant news flow that it seemed beyond belief. Yet there it was in the business pages: Australian software billionaire Mike Cannon-Brookes and iron ore billionaire Andrew "Twiggy" Forrest have a plan to supply a fifth of Singapore's electricity needs - all of it from solar power - via a 3750-kilometre underwater cable from the Northern Territory.
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Environment will take centre stage at Davos: World Economic Forum boss
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 20 January, 2020
Davos: The World Economic Forum is set to welcome both US President Donald Trump and climate activist Greta Thunberg to its annual meeting in Davos on Tuesday, with the environment set to top the agenda.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Nestlé creates market for food-grade recycled plastics
Food & Beverage
Mon 20 January, 2020
Nestlé has announced that it will invest up to $3 billion to lead the shift from virgin plastics to food-grade recycled plastics and to accelerate the development of innovative sustainable packaging solutions.
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Is canine responsiveness to people innate?
Cosmos
Mon 20 January, 2020
Two studies have independently found that wolf pups and stray dogs can correctly interpret human cues and respond to them without prior training.
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Giant squid, pretty big genome
Cosmos
Mon 20 January, 2020
The giant squid – the subject of many a dramatic tale – is actually as mysterious as it is big.
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7 sustainable furniture brands we love
Vogue Australia
Mon 20 January, 2020
For many people, interior decorating is an inherently joyful process. “Your home should tell the story of who you are and be a collection of what you love,” says Nate Berkus, Oprah’s go-to interior designer. Cue extensive Pinterest boards, intensive Instagram research and lengthy window shopping on weekends.
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Anthony Albanese flags 'ambitious' emissions target but won't recommit to 45% reduction
The Guardian
Sun 19 January, 2020
Anthony Albanese has described the decision to recommit to a 45% emissions reduction target by 2030 as “a mistake” and declared Labor would not take the same franking credits policy to the next election.
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Government fails to produce plan for threatened greater glider
The Age
Sun 19 January, 2020
The Morrison government has breached its own environmental laws by failing to produce a long-awaited recovery plan that could have assisted one of Australia’s most threatened animals in the wake of the bushfires.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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The warming planet is already killing people, so health policy must catch up
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 19 January, 2020
The devastation wrought by Australia’s worst bushfires has elevated the health effects of climate change right to the top of the national conversation. It used to be the case that we said we can’t pin a particular natural disaster down to climate change, but that natural disasters would occur more frequently. We’ve moved beyond that.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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If Morrison wants climate credibility, he should be pushing electric vehicles
The Age
Sun 19 January, 2020
Almost a year ago, a Senate inquiry into electric vehicles recommended the federal government lead the way in promoting the uptake of such vehicles. The committee urged the government to set targets for how many electric vehicles might be on the road decades from now, to develop a national strategy with the states about charging-infrastructure, and to commit to transitioning to battery-powered vehicles for the government fleet.
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The Sydney Morning Herald
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Nobody wants to watch the Australian Chokin’
The Age
Sun 19 January, 2020
The world’s eyes are on Australia for a reason besides that whole ''apocalyptic inferno'' thing, as this week marks the start of the Australian Open, our annual contest of tennis and heat exhaustion at Melbourne Park. And what everyone’s been seeing during the past week’s qualifiers is tennis players choking – being unable to breathe, as opposed to playing like Tim Henman at Wimbledon.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Australia is losing its capacity to understand environmental recovery
The Canberra Times
Sun 19 January, 2020
By April 2020 let's hope that Australia's catastrophic fire season is finally over ... at least until next season. The forests, woodlands and native grasslands that have been burned are not permanently destroyed as often proclaimed in the media. But they will take some time to regrow. Most forests will recover, although others may be irreversibly changed. But will koala populations rebound? How will other iconic native animals fare, like marsupial gliding possums and lyrebirds?
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The conservation effort returning lost seaweed to Sydney's shores
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 19 January, 2020
A school of striped fish with yellow tails darts through the water. Larger fish linger in bushes of swaying brown kelp on the ocean floor, and above them two researchers swim past in scuba gear.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Icon Water says the Canberra drought is close to the 'worst-case scenario'
The Canberra Times
Sun 19 January, 2020
Canberra's drought has almost reached the worst-case scenario planned for by Icon Water, and at this point the city would need about 100 millimetres of rain to make an impact on dam levels, Icon Water managing director Ray Hezkial said.
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Bring on the royal commission into Australia's climate change policy
The Canberra Times
Sat 18 January, 2020
Bring on the royal commission into the fires. Bring on a broad-ranging inquiry and a commissioner who is someone of independence, competence and integrity. This week's essay by former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull makes this more imperative that ever.
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The big money leaves coal for dust
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 18 January, 2020
Most Australians will not have heard of Larry Fink before this week, and many still may not have, but it is worth getting to know a little about him to understand the world’s fast-shifting response to climate change and why the Australian government is being left behind.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Why Australia needs to consider nuclear power to meet energy needs
The Australian
Sat 18 January, 2020
Here is a reliable power source that’s almost totally emissions-free and produces no air pollution. And while the main rational argument against nuclear power has been the cost, that now appears to be falling.
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Revealed: Widespread species devastation following 'unprecedented' fires
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 18 January, 2020
More than a third of NSW's national park land has been burnt by this season's "unprecedented" bushfires, potentially pushing dozens of threatened species including the long-footed potoroo to extinction in the wild.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Filipinos turn volcano's ash, plastic trash into bricks
Yahoo News
Sat 18 January, 2020
Ash spewed by a Philippine volcano is being mixed with plastic waste to make bricks in an inventive response to the country's persistent problems of pollution and frequent natural disasters.
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Can Scott Morrison seize this watershed moment for climate policy?
The Sydney Morning Herald
Fri 17 January, 2020
Andrew Hirst, the no-nonsense Liberal Party federal director, had a blunt warning for cabinet ministers who were still swept up in shock of Morrison's May Miracle.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Australia's climate crisis is an opportunity with global potential
The Age
Fri 17 January, 2020
Australia isn't just squandering its unique economic opportunity from emissions reduction, economist Ross Garnaut says it is also discouraging other countries from ambitious action on climate change.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Welcome aboard, denialists: now let's stop fiddling and start fixing
The Sydney Morning Herald
Fri 17 January, 2020
The first day of the year – a time when many look to the year ahead and resolve to make a change. This New Year’s Day, change was palpable. It filled the air.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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After the smoke clears: a path to zero emissions
The Age
Fri 17 January, 2020
A pall has hung over south-eastern Australia since the untimely fires in NSW and Queensland late last winter. It will lift to reveal a diminished natural and human heritage. Beautiful parts of Australia have been disfigured. The lift may also reveal a changed political environment, in which all governments want to join the global action against the climate change threat to our security and prosperity.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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With costs approaching $100 billion, the fires are Australia’s costliest natural disaster
The Conversation
Fri 17 January, 2020
It’s hard to estimate the eventual economic cost of Australia’s 2019-20 megafires, partly because they are still underway, and partly because it is hard to know the cost to attribute to deaths and the decimation of species and habitats, but it is easy to get an idea of its significance – the cost will be unprecedented.
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Before we rush to rebuild after fires, we need to think about where and how
The Conversation
Fri 17 January, 2020
A primary school in East Gippsland was burnt down in the current bushfire crisis. While Premier Daniel Andrews immediately committed to rebuilding the school as it was, media reported the local CFA captain didn’t want it rebuilt.
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