Issue date : Tue 14 January, 2020
Estimated Reading Time : 06 Min 07 Seconds
Number of items : 72
Climate-change disasters threaten credit ratings: Moody’s
The Australian
Tue 14 January, 2020
Increasingly frequent natural disasters due to climate change could hurt the credit ratings of both the federal government and Australia’s state governments, influential ratings agency Moody’s Investors Service has warned.
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Fire inquiry must look at climate change
The Australian Financial Review
Tue 14 January, 2020
It's essential that climate change be part of an inquiry into the bushfires raging across the country, says former Supreme Court judge Bernard Teague.
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New powers push a political response to bushfires
The Australian Financial Review
Tue 14 January, 2020
Is the call for constitutional change to assist with future fire crisis driven by operational needs or by politics?
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Sustainability trends brands can expect in 2020
CMO
Tue 14 January, 2020
Marketers have made strides this year in sustainability with the number of brands rallying behind the Not Business As Usual alliance for action against climate change being a sign of the times. While sustainability efforts have gained momentum this year, 2020 is shaping up to be the year brands are really held accountable for their work in this area.
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Climate activist turns down Siemens' offer of seat on energy board
The Guardian
Tue 14 January, 2020
The leader of Germany’s Friday for Future climate protests has said she turned down a seat on the board of Siemens’ new energy business amid growing anger over its role in a controversial coalmining project in Australia as she feared she would lose the right to criticise the company.
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5 ways Country Road is deepening its commitment to a more sustainable future
Vogue Australia
Tue 14 January, 2020
Now, more than ever, is the time to start educating ourselves on where and how our clothes are made. As we enter a new decade, it’s important for the health of our planet that we shop sustainably by looking to brands that can tell us the backstory of any given garment. It’s an important virtue that Australian heritage label Country Road has made a commitment to as it continues to prioritise sustainable practices. Here are all the ways the beloved brand is making a change.
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Cattle Hill wind farm begins production in Tasmania
Reneweconomy
Tue 14 January, 2020
The new Cattle Hill wind farm in Tasmania has begun production, taking the number of large scale wind farms in the island state to three.
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The ecological consequences of mass mortality events
Cosmos
Tue 14 January, 2020
The unprecedented wildfire raging across Australia is not only destroying human lives, but has killed hundreds of millions of animals – perhaps billions before it is all over.
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Antarctic alert for invading mussels
Cosmos
Tue 14 January, 2020
Mussels may look rather mild-mannered, but they are prominent in a new list of non-native species most likely to invade the Antarctic Peninsula over the next decade.
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How do ancient trees grow so old?
Cosmos
Tue 14 January, 2020
Some large trees have steadfastly endured for hundreds, even thousands of years, surviving through generations of humans and other plants and animals – but how they do this has been a mystery.
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Oceans are as hot as humans have known them and we’re to blame
The Guardian
Tue 14 January, 2020
Each year, unfathomable amounts of energy are added to the oceans. Scientists measure heat in joules; the amount of heat in the oceans is so large that we report it in zettajoules. What is a zettajoule? It is 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 joules. The amount of heat we are putting into the oceans is equivalent to about five Hiroshima atom bombs of energy every second.
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Melbourne chokes as bushfire smoke settles over the city
News.com.au
Tue 14 January, 2020
Melbourne has been plunged into a smoky darkness this morning after haze from the ongoing bushfires left the city with the second worst air pollution in the world.
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NT News
The Advertiser
The Mercury
The Sydney suburbs where rainfall is at it lowest on record
The Sydney Morning Herald
Tue 14 January, 2020
Rain records tumbled to their lowest levels at more than half of the long-running weather stations within 200km of Sydney in the last three months of 2019.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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A pocket guide to climate change
ABC News
Mon 13 January, 2020
The first step to being able to speak about climate change is to understand it. Not everyone learned about it in school, so here are the basics everyone should know.
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'Port Arthur moment': Business urges PM to lead on climate amid bushfire crisis
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 13 January, 2020
Business leaders have described the unfolding bushfire crisis as a "Port Arthur moment", urging the Morrison government to adopt a co-ordinated national strategy to confront climate change and aggressively reduce carbon emissions.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Fires won't burn AAA credit rating
The Australian Financial Review
Mon 13 January, 2020
Credit ratings agencies say if the bushfire crisis causes a short delay in the budget returning to surplus it won't jeopardise Australia's AAA rating, but urged fiscal prudence in the years ahead.
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Government pledges $50m for wildlife impacted by bushfires as koalas may become endangered
ABC News
Mon 13 January, 2020
The Federal Environment Minister is concerned koalas could now be endangered in some areas as the Government establishes a $50 million emergency fund to address the devastating loss of wildlife this bushfire season.
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Renewables key to carbon cuts as 100 technologies in frame
The Australian
Mon 13 January, 2020
Scott Morrison’s plan to seek deeper cuts to Australia’s carbon emissions will consider more than 100 new technologies, predicts a doubling of renewable energy in the electricity grid within 10 years and aims to modernise high-­polluting industries.
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'Fake number': Labor says Morrison is fudging emissions figures
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 13 January, 2020
Labor has accused Prime Minister Scott Morrison of using a “fake number” to mislead Australians about cuts to greenhouse gas emissions amid a growing debate within government ranks over stronger action on climate change.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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'Great sadness': Senior environment official bemoans staff demotion
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 13 January, 2020
The head of one of the NSW government's biggest departments has told staff the demotion of its co-ordinator-general was "a source of great sadness".
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Taking action on climate is hard. Here are five questions to help Australia seize this moment
The Guardian
Mon 13 January, 2020
In late 2019, before the bushfires hit crisis level, concern about climate change in Australia was at record levels. Since then at least 27 people have lost their lives, millions of animals have died and the navy has been called in to evacuate beaches. The devastating impacts of climate change are tragically becoming real for many. And many, from bushfire survivors to business leaders to firefighters, are calling for action.
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The man in the irony mask
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 13 January, 2020
I put on a respirator mask and headed into town. News reports say particulates in the smoke over Sydney are at hazardous levels; people are urged to stay inside.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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I'm a Greens minister and ordered hazard-reduction burning
The Age
Mon 13 January, 2020
The terrible bushfires ravaging Australia have sparked a political debate about where to lay blame. Unsurprisingly, right-wing critics and others in power have sought a scapegoat. They've tried to blame the fires on the Greens, for apparently not supporting hazard reduction burning.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Make wildlife recovery efforts about science, not politics
The Age
Mon 13 January, 2020
The usual reaction to bushfires in past years has been to say confidently that all this will regenerate, that fire stokes the Australian landscape in ways that do not happen elsewhere in the world. That is what science, Indigenous practices and simple observation have shown us time and again.
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Burning our koalas: Australia's shame
Independent Australia
Mon 13 January, 2020
The anger which is being fed daily by the abject refusal of politicians to address climate impacts is gaining the same intensity as the fires, which have burned an area the size of South Korea — so far.
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Australia needs to punch above its weight on carbon emissions
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 13 January, 2020
As Australia’s bushfire disaster has unfolded, the politics of climate change has come sharply back into focus. To many, climate politics appears very complex. But for elected politicians, it should be very simple.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Moving to ultra-low emissions is an opportunity, not a threat
The Age
Mon 13 January, 2020
One of the dominant ideas buzzing around the internet is that there’s little we can do to escape the prospect of more frequent and worse bushfires - ever. That’s because there’s little we can do to slow or reverse climate changes.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Australia can have zero emissions and still profit from minerals, says Ross Garnaut
ABC News
Mon 13 January, 2020
Australia could have avoided the scale of the devastating bushfires, Professor Ross Garnaut has said as he warned the situation would continue to worsen if there wasn't global action on climate change, something he said didn't have to come at the expense of the economy.
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The New Daily
Ross Garnaut urges zero emissions target ‘ASAP’
The Canberra Times
The Newcastle Herald
SBS World News Australia
Norway's hypocrisy shows oil age not over yet
The Australian Financial Review
Mon 13 January, 2020
The nation projects an image of being at the vanguard of combating climate change, with its $US1 trillion sovereign wealth fund declaring last year it would divest companies focused solely on oil and gas exploration.
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Siemens sticks with Adani contract after intervention from Canavan
Reneweconomy
Mon 13 January, 2020
German industrial giant Siemens says it will continue to work with Adani’s controversial Carmichael coal mine after the company’s CEO cited arguments from federal resources minister Matt Canavan in an open letter justifying the decision.
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UK knitters join forces to make joey pouches, koala mittens amid bushfire crisis
News.com.au
Mon 13 January, 2020
Thousands of knitters across the UK are making pouches and mittens for Australia's injured wildlife as the country faces yet another week of bushfire catastrophe.
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NT News
The Advertiser
The Daily Telegraph
The Geelong Advertiser
The Gold Coast Bulletin
The Mercury
The Weekly Times
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'Uncharted territory' as species likely go extinct in bushfires
The Age
Mon 13 January, 2020
Species have likely already gone extinct in Australia's catastrophic bushfires and experts warn it may take a decade to find out which ones due to lack of staff and expertise.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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New songbird species found on Indonesian islands
Cosmos
Mon 13 January, 2020
Tucked away in three of the most geographically isolated Indonesian islands of Wallacea, known for their unique and rich biodiversity, researchers have discovered 10 new species and subspecies of songbirds.
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Tasmanian eucalypt dubbed Greta Thunberg
Yahoo News
Mon 13 January, 2020
Greta Thunberg has made worldwide headlines for her climate activism, and now conservationists in Tasmania have named a tree after her.
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7 News
Perthnow
SBS World News Australia
The Canberra Times
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The sweet relief of rain after bushfires threatens disaster for our rivers
The Conversation
Mon 13 January, 2020
When heavy rainfall eventually extinguishes the flames ravaging south-east Australia, another ecological threat will arise. Sediment, ash and debris washing into our waterways, particularly in the Murray-Darling Basin, may decimate aquatic life.
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Even for an air pollution historian like me, these past weeks have been a shock
The Conversation
Mon 13 January, 2020
Smoke from this season’s bushfires has turned the sun red, the moon orange and the sky an insipid grey. It has obscured iconic views tourists flock to see. Far more than an aesthetic problem, it has forced business shutdowns, triggered health problems and kept children indoors for weeks.
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The Guardian
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Arup report on photovoltaics and the circular economy
PV Magazine
Mon 13 January, 2020
As the world strives to arrest the climate crisis and increases its investment in solar energy, the industry must address its own sustainability. A new report produced by Arup in Australia looks at how to apply principles of the circular economy to current and future PV waste management.
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Australian designers on how our shopping habits can be kinder to the environment in 2020
Vogue Australia
Mon 13 January, 2020
As we experience the devastating effects of climate change in our own backyard, our local designers are reckoning with the role we all play in the cycle of production and consumption. As we look to create change out of a difficult time, Australian design talent (and two kiwis) here shines a light on how to achieve a lower-impact lifestyle.
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Harper Bazaar
How To Make Your Wardrobe More Eco-Friendly
Hotter temperatures could kill 2,000 more a year in US: study
Yahoo News
Mon 13 January, 2020
A rise in temperature of just two degrees Celsius could lead to an additional 2,100 deaths from injuries every year in the United States, researchers said Monday, highlighting another danger posed by global warming.
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