Issue date : Wed 30 October, 2019
Estimated Reading Time : 03 Min 59 Seconds
Number of items : 47
It's not economy or environment: Albanese
9 News
Wed 30 October, 2019
Labor leader Anthony Albanese says there is a "false dichotomy" that voters must choose between the economy or the environment.
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7 News
The Canberra Times
The West Australian
Yahoo News
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Protecting the places we love: here are 7 ways our nature laws must be fixed
The Conversation
Wed 30 October, 2019
Environment Minister Sussan Ley yesterday announced a ten-yearly review of Australia’s national environmental laws. It could not come at a more critical time, as the environment struggles under unprecedented development pressures, climate change impacts and a crippling drought.
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Greece pays price of EU’s ‘waste management’ plan
The Australian
Wed 30 October, 2019
Athens was never Vienna, Bern or Stockholm, but it was once a safer, cleaner city. In between lulls in its pollution, one could still smell jasmine and basil. Nowadays, there’s a pungent stench wafting from its backstreets. It is the smell of human desperation and hopelessness. You notice it particularly in the morning and the closer you get to the centre.
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Responsibility for plastic pollution starts at the top
The Fifth Estate
Wed 30 October, 2019
If the corporate world wants to play a meaningful role in solving our plastic pollution crisis it should stop blaming consumers and start accepting responsibility for its packaging.
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AGL signs huge battery storage deal, hails “dawn of battery age”
Reneweconomy
Wed 30 October, 2019
Australian energy giant AGL has signed a major deal for battery storage that will see four large-scale batteries – each of 50MW/100MWh – developed in NSW by the Chinese-Australian renewable energy company Maoneng.
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New analysis triples risk from rising sea levels
Cosmos
Wed 30 October, 2019
In three decades from now more than 300 million people’s homes could face annual coastal flooding and new high tide levels could cover land currently inhabited by around 150 million – many of them in Asia.
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Like those diamond earrings? Rent them
The Australian Financial Review
Wed 30 October, 2019
As rental services become more popular and mainstream, it seems you can hire just about anything – including fine jewellery.
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Review of federal environment laws will cut 'green tape' and speed up approvals
The Guardian
Tue 29 October, 2019
The Morrison government has promised a review of national environmental laws will “tackle green tape” and reduce delays in project approvals that it said costs the economy about $300m a year.
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Inquiry into waste management and recycling industries commences
Inside Waste
Tue 29 October, 2019
An inquiry into Australia’s waste management and recycling industries has commenced by the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Industry, Innovation, Science and Resources.
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Taxpayers may face $230 million bill to clean up toxic stockpiles
The Age
Tue 29 October, 2019
Taxpayers could be forced to spend at least $230 million to clean up a minimum of 15 toxic waste stockpiles linked to the largest illegal dumping syndicate in Victoria’s history.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Has the climate crisis made California too dangerous to live in?
The Guardian
Tue 29 October, 2019
Monday morning dawned smoky across much of California, and it dawned scary – over the weekend winds as high as a hundred miles an hour had whipped wildfires through forests and subdivisions.
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Six little wheelie bins, lined along a wall ... frankly won't work
The Age
Tue 29 October, 2019
After wrestling my full green bin onto the street this week and finding somewhere to place it amongst the parked cars, I stood surveying the suburban landscape. Having just read about the potential plan to provide residents with six bins (or stackable crates) for sorting their recycling, I wondered at the almost farcical view on recycling night as residents line up their new bins in between vehicles, road signs and everyone else’s recycling receptacles. Next add in the green waste and landfill rubbish bins and the whole nature strip will be a veritable minefield of waste containers. And finally, but most dramatically, add in the regular high winds that seem to always occur on recycling night and the entire suburb will be bedecked like a rubbish truck exploded on its rounds.
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Forrest takes swipe at BHP, Rio over customer emissions claims
The Australian Financial Review
Tue 29 October, 2019
Fortescue Metals Group chairman Andrew Forrest has taken a swipe at rival iron ore mining giants Rio Tinto and BHP over their claims about reducing customer greenhouse gas emissions.
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Sydney Opera House commits to UN Sustainable Development Goals
Reneweconomy
Tue 29 October, 2019
The Sydney Opera House has announced its commitment to the UN Sustainable Development Goals as part of a push to reduce the environmental footprint of one of Australia’s most iconic buildings, including a goal to become ‘climate positive’.
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Every building counts – time to tackle the laggards
The Fifth Estate
Tue 29 October, 2019
It seems building energy efficiency is even palatable enough for federal energy and emissions reduction minister Angus Taylor as an emissions abatement opportunity.
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Pollution data details resurface in Brisbane creek project
The Brisbane Times
Tue 29 October, 2019
The finer details of historical pollution at the 650-hectare Oxley Creek site are resurfacing three years in to Brisbane City Council's 20-year transformation project.
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Australia’s beloved native birds are disappearing – and the cause is clear
The Guardian
Tue 29 October, 2019
Across parts of Australia, vast areas of native vegetation have been cleared and replaced by our cities, farms and infrastructure. When native vegetation is removed, the habitat and resources that it provides for native wildlife are invariably lost.
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All the leaves are brown: Mass defoliation adds to fire risk around Brisbane
The Brisbane Times
Tue 29 October, 2019
The rapid defoliation of trees in the hills around Brisbane caused by drought stress over the last two months is adding to the fuel load in bushfire-prone communities and posing new management issues for authorities.
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The Age
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Out-of-control bushfire threatens homes near Port Macquarie
The Sydney Morning Herald
Tue 29 October, 2019
An emergency warning has been issued for residents near Port Macquarie on the NSW Mid North Coast as a bushfire burns out of control on Tuesday afternoon.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
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Fishing plastic 'ghost nets' out of the Baltic
Yahoo News
Tue 29 October, 2019
On a small fishing boat out in the Baltic Sea, Pekka Kotilainen rifles through buckets of fishing gear, mixed with rubbish and mussel shells.
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Illegal US waste diverted to India from Indonesia
The Australian
Tue 29 October, 2019
Anti-waste campaigners have accused Indonesia of running a “global waste shell game” pointing to shipping data they say shows dozens of containers of illegal American plastic and paper scrap that authorities had vowed to return to the US were diverted to other developing nations.
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Climate protesters clash with police outside Melbourne international mining conference
ABC News
Tue 29 October, 2019
Climate change protesters have clashed with police in violent scenes outside an international mining conference in Melbourne.
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Adelaide Festival to be carbon neutral
The Australian
Tue 29 October, 2019
The Adelaide Festival is turning green for its 60th anniversary, with next year’s event to be carbon neutral for the first time.
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