Issue date : Mon 7 October, 2019
Estimated Reading Time : 04 Min 14 Seconds
Number of items : 50
They stopped the Mangles Bay Marina, why not the Mandurah Estuary dredge?
WAToday
Mon 7 October, 2019
Environmental groups looking for a way to halt the development of a marina in the heart of the Mandurah Estuary are calling on the state and federal governments to "find a solution and stop mucking around".
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
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Time to come clean on climate cost
The Australian Financial Review
Mon 7 October, 2019
Successive governments have never been honest with voters about the real cost and benefits of climate policy. Maybe it is time for a fact-based inquiry.
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BP's grim warning on carbon emissions
The Australian Financial Review
Mon 7 October, 2019
The world's tardiness in starting to reduce carbon emissions will make the inevitable transition to net zero emissions more disorderly and costly, according to energy major BP's chief economist, Spencer Dale, who is calling on society to demand governments set the policies to drive the energy transition.
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Extinction Rebellion: how to craft a protest brand
The Conversation
Mon 7 October, 2019
Visual arts and performance have always been central to protest and resistance movements in Australia. Posters, street theatre, music and symbolic actions are part of the vocabulary of calls for social and political change.
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Water resources minister 'totally' accepts drought linked to climate change
The Guardian
Sun 6 October, 2019
The drought and water resources minister, David Littleproud, has acknowledged he “totally” accepts that worsening droughts are linked to climate change, as he signalled more taxpayer support for regional communities was coming as Australia’s big dry “escalates”.
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The Australian
Minister accepts climate change
The Australian
David Littleproud ‘totally’ accepts climate change leads to drought
9 News
We're acting on drought report: minister
The Canberra Times
The Newcastle Herald
Perthnow
Warragamba plan 'flawed': former SES deputy
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 6 October, 2019
The former deputy of the NSW State Emergency Service says the government's plan to raise the Warragamba Dam wall is “flawed,” warning it could encourage development in floodplains that will remain vulnerable to a catastrophic flood.
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Pope urges bold action to protect Amazon
News.com.au
Sun 6 October, 2019
Pope Francis has urged bishops to boldly shake up the status quo as they chart ways to better care for the Amazon and its indigenous people amid threats from forest fires, development and what he called ideological "ashes of fear".
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NT News
Perthnow
The Age
The Australian
The Brisbane Times
The Geelong Advertiser
The Gold Coast Bulletin
The Mercury
The Sydney Morning Herald
The Weekly Times
The West Australian
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
Joe Hildebrand on why the climate kids can’t win
News.com.au
Sun 6 October, 2019
Amid all the outrage on both sides of the Greta Thunberg debate, there is one question that remains unanswered, writes Joe Hildebrand.
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Canberra's unchanging climate bubble
The Canberra Times
Sun 6 October, 2019
In another never-to-be-forgotten column in another place (Saturday's Canberra Times) I agonised about how challenging it would be for all of us who are grown ups to answer a knock on the door and to find on our doorsteps the furious young Greta Thunberg. There she is, seething "How dare you?!" and demanding to know how and why we've gambolled through our greedy, bourgeois, recklessly consuming lives, never noticing how, in this nightmarish Anthropocene epoch, mankind is torturing our planet.
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Greta or Tony? It's the burning issue of the age
The Advertiser
Fri 4 October, 2019
“How dare you!” Greta Thunberg gave the world’s leaders a tongue lashing at the 2019 UN Climate Action Conference in New York. “You’ve stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words.” She let fly with unbridled anger about lack of action on global warming. “How dare you pretend this can be solved with business as usual and some technical solutions.”
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14 top companies in the AGM shooting gallery
The Australian Financial Review
Sun 6 October, 2019
Board spills are on the cards as directors get ready to face shareholders fired up over issues ranging from pay and bonuses to diversity and climate change.
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Fractured future: Water fears as drilling for gas begins in the NT
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 6 October, 2019
On a cool April morning in Darwin, a group of people dressed in high-vis vests walks towards Parliament House. Alongside them trundles a mini-bulldozer, a drill bit in front. It’s early, and politicians won’t start arriving at the towering white building - known locally as the “wedding cake” - for another hour.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
Report wants ‘all options’ for water security
Government News
Sun 6 October, 2019
A new report by an association of water stakeholders is calling for all water supply options be put on the table as Australia’s regional and urban centres face a worsening drought crisis and increasing population pressure.
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Greta Thunberg is a danger to the climate debate
News.com.au
Sat 5 October, 2019
The hero of tomorrow might turn out to be the kryptonite from within if we don’t make one vital change to how we portray her.
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The need for sustainable farming
The Saturday Paper
Sat 5 October, 2019
“Don’t eat beef,” screamed the headlines when the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its latest report on climate change and land. At least that’s what most of the media suggested.
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How to save the planet? Overcome plant blindness
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 5 October, 2019
We hear much about the urgent need to save the koala as it possibly heads towards extinction – and yes, this is essential and critical.
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Why is everyone afraid of Greta Thunberg?
The Australian
Sat 5 October, 2019
Passivity is written into the Australian vernacular. No worries. She’ll be right mate. Throw another shrimp on the barbie. For most of us, our default is passivity; or it’s at least how we want the world to see us. Laid-back, chilled, relaxed. Passivity is easy, non-threatening. Deadening. Because it means an acceptance that someone is going to look after us; we let go, we trust. “Passivity may be the easy course,” Noam Chomsky wrote, “but it is hardly the honourable one.”
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Bilbies released into massive NSW 'natural time capsule'
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 5 October, 2019
Bilbies are roaming the south-west of NSW for the first time in more than a century after 30 of the marsupials were released into a section of Mallee Cliffs National Park, protected by the largest enclosure of its kind in the southern hemisphere.
Also Appeared In
The Age
The Brisbane Times
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
What’s killing these trees?
The Australian
Sat 5 October, 2019
There’s a photo that 16-year-old Ivy McGufficke likes to look at every time she returns to her family farm near Cooma after a term at boarding school. It’s 2005 and two-year-old Ivy is standing in a sheep pen wearing a blue jacket, holding a half-eaten sandwich in one hand and in the other an old sheep pellet tub, repurposed as a peg bucket. Her destiny is already sealed; the youngest of three daughters born to Monaro graziers Alan and Michelle McGufficke, she will grow up as connected to this land as the merinos that poke their woolly heads over the sheep race alongside her.
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Inadequate drought preparation may prove to be political disaster too
The Age
Fri 4 October, 2019
Panicky. That’s a word to describe the Morrison government’s response to a national drought emergency. Lack of rain, arid conditions, scorching winds and higher temperatures are contributing to an evolving disaster against the background of a contentious climate change debate. This is a challenge that will become increasingly difficult for the governments, federal and state, to ignore as water supplies run down in New South Wales towns such as Dubbo and Queensland towns such as Stanthorpe. Risks of bushfire will be further elevated.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
Metal straws are killing people too
The Age
Fri 4 October, 2019
Plastic straws used to be good and kind and nice and helpful. For decades they let us slurp our milkshakes through them, let us slice them into pieces for school craft projects, let us shoot paper-wads with them during boring maths classes, let us snort cocaine up them when we were all Wall Street coke-heads in the '90s. Then, for some reason, plastic straws got sick of all the slurping and slicing and shooting and snorting … and they turned evil. They began polluting our beaches, toxifying our landfill, jamming themselves up the noses of poor innocent turtles - not the Wall Street coke-head turtles from the '90s, who totally deserved it.
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The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Australia's tough climate number to crack
The Australian Financial Review
Fri 4 October, 2019
It's the number at the centre of Australia's climate and energy wars – 695 million tonnes of carbon dioxide.
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Adani mine: another insurer distances itself from Carmichael project
The Guardian
Fri 4 October, 2019
A Lloyd’s of London insurer – considered one of the few remaining possible underwriters for elements of the Carmichael coal project – has distanced itself from Adani and says it is not involved in negotiations.
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Drought steals lives of a generation crying for action
The Australian Financial Review
Fri 4 October, 2019
Stanthorpe, Queensland | The dirt underfoot as dry as anyone can remember, Mike Hayes sees numbers everywhere as he walks through dusty rows of grapevines.
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How scientists finally got Americans to worry about the climate
The Australian Financial Review
Fri 4 October, 2019
The evidence was strong 10 years ago, even 20, that the world had a problem with global warming. We knew then that it was going to exacerbate extreme weather and heat waves and raise the sea level. But nearly half of Americans didn't take it seriously. Now they do, according to polls, and what changed wasn't the amount of evidence but a shift in political forces and some changes in the way scientists learnt to make their case.
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