Issue date : Mon 3 December, 2018
Estimated Reading Time : 05 Min 41 Seconds
Number of items : 67
Paris climate deal fragile as nationalism, populism sweep the world
The Australian Financial Review
Mon 3 December, 2018
It is three years since more than 150 heads of state gathered in Paris to negotiate a climate pact that, for the first time, covered the whole world. The landmark deal — following tortuous talks — was celebrated as a triumph not only for the environment, but also for global co-operation.
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Tragedy of the Commons killing oceans | Tim Roberts
The Newcastle Herald
Mon 3 December, 2018
World Fisheries Day, celebrated on November 21, is a day to focus on the sustainability of this most important food resource. More than two-thirds of the world's fisheries have been overfished and more than one third are in a state of decline because of loss of essential fish habitats, pollution, and global warming.
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CEOs unite to call for ditching of 'dangerous' energy divestment rules
The Australian Financial Review
Mon 3 December, 2018
Top energy industry leaders have come out firing against what they say is an extraordinary and dangerous over-reach of power by the federal government in proposed legislation to force asset sales, developed with unprecedented secrecy and haste.
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GBCA wins Banksia sustainability award
Architecture and Design
Mon 3 December, 2018
The Banksia Foundation has awarded it the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA) the NFP and NGO Award for its Green Star certification initiative.
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Vet Anne Fawcett: The effects of climate change on our pets
The Daily Telegraph
Sun 2 December, 2018
Climate change is expected to have a negative impact on the health and welfare of people, farm animals and wildlife, but it will also affect companion animals.
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Drones, sensors and blockchain for water quality control
Food & Beverage
Mon 3 December, 2018
In Russia, approximately 70 per cent of drinking water comes from surface, while the rest comes from groundwater. Twenty-five per cent of the world’s fresh water is located in Russian territories.
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Who owns your waste? Thefts from bins and backyards anger recyclers
The Canberra Times
Mon 3 December, 2018
There's been a spate of thefts of discarded cans and bottles, with victims claiming thieves just take the stuff they've stolen to recycling depots to get the 10 cents an item.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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ACT seeks climate litigation advice as court action gathers momentum
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 2 December, 2018
The ACT is set to join growing global efforts to use courts to press for urgent action to curb greenhouse gas emissions, with Climate Minister Shane Rattenbury seeking legal advice on how to lower litigation barriers.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Thousands march in Germany calling for end to coal power
Yahoo!7 News
Sun 2 December, 2018
Thousands of people marched in Berlin and Cologne on Saturday calling for Germany to abandon coal-powered electricity generation, on the eve of a major climate conference in Poland.
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G20 agrees to reform WTO, US holds out on climate
The Australian Financial Review
Sun 2 December, 2018
Buenos Aires |The G20 nations have sent mixed messages on trade by agreeing to reform the World Trade Organisation while dropping any reference to the need to fight protectionism in order to appease the United States.
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'New weapon': courts offer hope for driving serious climate action
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 2 December, 2018
In the not so far-off future, if your home is flooded by extreme rain or razed by an unseasonable bushfire, the first people to turn up on your property after the emergency crews could be bearing legal documents.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Queensland bushfires flare up as strong winds test exhausted firefighters
The Guardian
Sun 2 December, 2018
The bushfire emergency in central Queensland flared up on Sunday evening with residents in the path of the massive Deepwater blaze told to leave immediately.
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SBS World News Australia
Yahoo!7 News
Concerns toxic blaze lit to conceal chemical stores
The Age
Sun 2 December, 2018
One of the worst industrial fires in Victoria’s recent history is under investigation by police and the coroner amid concerns it was deliberately lit to destroy evidence the building was being used to illegally store hundreds of barrels of dangerous waste chemicals.
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The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Supermarket ban sees '80% drop' in plastic bag consumption nationwide
The Guardian
Sun 2 December, 2018
The ban on single-use plastic bags by Australia’s two largest supermarkets prevented the introduction of an estimated 1.5 billion bags into the environment, and the retail industry is hopeful this is only the beginning.
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ABC News
The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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News.com.au
Australia-wide bag ban leads to 1.5 billion fewer plastic bags in the environment
NT News
The Daily Telegraph
The Mercury
G20 summit stumbles on trade, climate
News.com.au
Sat 1 December, 2018
The G20 summit is meant to focus on issues such as labour, infrastructure, , climate and commerce. But as it began, those themes seemed like afterthoughts.
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The Australian
The Weekly Times
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Grim tidings from science on climate change
Yahoo!7 News
Sat 1 December, 2018
Scientists monitoring the Earth's climate and environment have delivered a cascade of grim news this year, adding a sense of urgency to UN talks starting next week in Poland on how best to draw down the greenhouse gases that drive global warming.
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Curry: Climate Change Won't Drown Us
The Herald Sun
Sat 1 December, 2018
Climate scientist Judith Curry completes her review of the evidence on sea level rises:
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It should not be up to Australia's schoolchildren to stop Adani
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 1 December, 2018
The Coalition government under Scott Morrison appears to have forgotten the first rule of holes: when you’re in one, stop digging. It’s far too early to describe the Morrison government as terminal; the six months or so till a mooted May federal election is a long time in politics. But the government seems content to write off the message from Liberal voters in Wentworth and Victoria, particularly on climate change, because they do not represent its ‘base’. God only knows where the Liberal base is if it isn’t located in blue ribbon Liberal seats, but who are we to argue?
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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IKEA targets greenhouse gas emissions cutv
News.com.au
Sat 1 December, 2018
IKEA, the world's biggest furniture group, has pledged to cut greenhouse gas emissions from its production by 80 per cent in absolute terms by 2030 from their levels two years ago.
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Ten Daily
The Advertiser
The Australian
The Geelong Advertiser
The Gold Coast Bulletin
The Mercury
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GE says Australia's renewable challenge isn't investment, it's connecting it all
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 1 December, 2018
The world’s largest onshore wind turbines are slated to hit Australia first but the company behind the giant machines has warned that inadequate electricity infrastructure means new renewable power could be going to waste.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Anchorage, Alaska rocked by 7.0 and 5.7 earthquakes sending people fleeing in panic
News.com.au
Sat 1 December, 2018
Consecutive earthquakes measuring 7.0 and 5.7 have shattered highways and rocked buildings in Anchorage, Alaska and the surrounding area, sending people running into the streets and briefly triggering a tsunami warning for islands and coastal areas south of the city.
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Is geotagging on Instagram ruining natural wonders? Some say yes
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 1 December, 2018
Sorry, Instagrammers. You are ruining Wyoming. Last week, the Jackson Hole Travel & Tourism Board asked visitors to stop geotagging photographs on social media in an effort to protect the state's pristine forests and remote lakes. Explaining the campaign, Brian Modena, a tourism-board member, suggested the landscape was under threat from visitors drawn by the beautiful vistas on Instagram.
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Thousands of students skip school to attend strikes for climate action
News.com.au
Fri 30 November, 2018
Incredible scenes are unfolding in Australia’s capital cities where thousands of students have skipped school in protest against the Morrison Government’s lack of action on climate change.
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The Gold Coast Bulletin
'No direct impacts' on reef: Minister defends Adani as activists target Labor
The Sydney Morning Herald
Fri 30 November, 2018
Opposition Leader Bill Shorten is resisting calls to stop the Adani coal mine if he wins the next election, in a position that clears the way for third-party activists to launch a blitz against Labor MPs in marginal seats.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Price off to Poland on defence mission
The Australian
Fri 30 November, 2018
Federal Environment Minister Melissa Price will lead Australia’s delegation to Poland this month despite Scott Morrison’s assurance his government would “not spend money on global climate conferences and all that nonsense”.
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COP24: rewilding is essential to the UK’s commitments on climate change
The Conversation
Fri 30 November, 2018
Humans have cut down half the trees on Earth since the dawn of agriculture – over 3 trillion of them. This huge loss holds the potential for massive reforestation today, which would protect local environments from soil loss, flash flooding and desertification and take up large quantities of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Despite these advantages, reforestation gets very little attention in our fight against climate change.
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Liberal Party torn apart by climate change: 'Not even Menzies could fix it'
The Australian Financial Review
Fri 30 November, 2018
Robert Menzies' Liberal Party is splintering. The pragmatic Party of Government designed by Menzies has been in power in Canberra for almost two-thirds of its 74-year history, but it's now in a "mess", as one senior minister put it.
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COP24: climate protesters must get radical and challenge economic growth
The Conversation
Fri 30 November, 2018
At the COP24 conference in Poland, countries are aiming to finalise the implementation plan for the 2015 Paris Agreement. The task has extra gravity in the wake of the recent IPCC report declaring that we have just 12 years to take the action needed to limit global warming to that infamous 1.5ᵒC target.
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Why battery-powered vehicles stack up better than hydrogen
The Conversation
Fri 30 November, 2018
Low energy efficiency is already a major problem for petrol and diesel vehicles. Typically, only 20% of the overall well-to-wheel energy is actually used to power these vehicles. The other 80% is lost through oil extraction, refinement, transport, evaporation, and engine heat. This low energy efficiency is the primary reason why fossil fuel vehicles are emissions-intensive, and relatively expensive to run.
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Yes, Knickers the steer is really, really big. But he’s far short of true genetic freak status
The Conversation
Fri 30 November, 2018
The story of Knickers the giant steer has gone viral on social media over the past week. Admittedly, the pictures show him towering over a herd of young Wagyu steers, with Wagyu being one of the smaller cattle breeds, which even enhances his size.
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Found: a lactating spider
Cosmos
Fri 30 November, 2018
A new study reveals a species of jumping spider in which newly hatched young are entirely dependent on a maternally excreted milk-like substance. Suckling continues for 40 days – well beyond the point at which the young can forage for themselves.
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Whales seen disguising themselves as ponds
Cosmos
Fri 30 November, 2018
Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) off the coast of Canada’s Vancouver Island have been caught on film tricking fish into becoming their lunch.
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Warty hammer orchids are sexual deceivers
The Conversation
Fri 30 November, 2018
Orchids are famed for their beautiful and alluring flowers – and the great lengths to which people will go to experience them in the wild. Among Australian orchids, evocative names such as The Butterfly Orchid, The Queen of Sheeba, and Cleopatra’s Needles conjure up images of rare and beautiful flowers.
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Strange seismic waves that rippled around world baffle scientists
ABC News
Fri 30 November, 2018
A mysterious ripple of seismic waves has travelled thousands of kilometres across the globe, tripping sensors throughout Africa, Canada, New Zealand, and Hawaii, seemingly without being felt by a single person.
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