Issue date : Wed 7 November, 2018
Estimated Reading Time : 04 Min 25 Seconds
Number of items : 52
Drugs in bugs: 69 pharmaceuticals found in invertebrates living in Melbourne’s streams
The Conversation
Wed 7 November, 2018
Pharmaceuticals from wastewater are making their way into aquatic invertebrates and spiders living in and next to Melbourne’s creeks, according to our study published today in Nature Communications.
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Former official criticises Angus Taylor over 'extraordinary' coal protection measure
The Sydney Morning Herald
Wed 7 November, 2018
A potential Morrison government move to shield new coal-fired power projects from the future costs of their carbon emissions amounts to a taxpayer-funded subsidy and would be an "extraordinary" and "irresponsible" move, the former chief of the federal government's green bank says.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Vic Liberals face heat over climate policy
9 News
Wed 7 November, 2018
The Victorian Liberal Party has been accused by environmentalists of having no plan to tackle climate change.
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SBS World News Australia
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Getting with the program: pharmacy and the environment
Australian Journal of Pharmacy
Wed 7 November, 2018
It’s one of the greatest issues of our time, but if you look around the pharmacy landscape, environmental issues hardly rate a mention. However, a dedicated band of pharmacists are working to change all this
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Clean energy plan can save Kimberley $14.8m, say activists
The Australian Financial Review
Wed 7 November, 2018
A clean energy plan using wind and solar energy and batteries to replace fossil fuel power can save the Kimberley region $14.8 million and avoid the need to get more gas by fracking in the sensitive region, say green activists backed by former WA Premier Carmel Lawrence.
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Chinese migrants follow and add to Australian city dwellers’ giant ecological footprints
The Conversation
Wed 7 November, 2018
Political debate about a “big Australia” has re-emerged in response to high levels of immigration, increasing congestion and high property prices in Sydney and Melbourne, where 90% of migrants settle. In 2010, China overtook the United Kingdom as Australia’s largest source of permanent migrants (a position now held by India). Since then, China-born migrants have averaged around 15% of the annual intake. That’s a significant contributor to the “Asianisation” of Sydney and Melbourne that Peter McDonald pointed to a decade ago.
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Details guided Malbena call
The Mercury
Tue 6 November, 2018
SO now we know the detailed reasons why Federal Environment Minister Melissa Price’s office decided Tasmania’s current most controversial tourism development did not need to be separately approved under federal biodiversity conservation laws.
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Latest Reminder: Nothing Green Ever Works
The Daily Telegraph
Tue 6 November, 2018
Beginning in 2000, successive NSW governments thought it ecologically wise to sow farmlands across the state with all manner of common household refuse:
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Anna Caldwell: Report into toxic waste spread across NSW farmland
The Daily Telegraph
Tue 6 November, 2018
Environment Minister Gabrielle Upton wasn’t briefed about toxic waste being spread across NSW farms as part of a green eco-scheme to ­divert household trash from landfill until six months after the EPA report.
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Minerals Council chief Stephen Galilee likened them to "the boy who cried wolf", but energy analysts are standing firm
The Newcastle Herald
Tue 6 November, 2018
THE NSW Minerals Council’s forecast of a bright future for Australian coal exports is based on shaky foundations, including a restricted interpretation of International Energy Agency predictions, said energy analysts criticised as “anti-coal” by Minerals Council chief executive Stephen Galilee.
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Surge in renewables delivering cheaper power, says TAI report
Reneweconomy
Mon 5 November, 2018
As ScoMo sets off in his big blue autographed campaign bus to Drive Down Electricity Prices in Queensland, the good news is that most of the hard work looks to have been already done for him.
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Look, no batteries! How “flexible” solar can help the grid, without storage
Reneweconomy
Tue 6 November, 2018
Solar is starting to make its presence felt on the Australian grid. In September, it delivered more output than wind energy for the first time. It is depressing wholesale prices in the middle of the day, occasionally sending them into negative territory in states like Queensland and Western Australia, and in some states like South Australia and W.A. it is sending grid demand to record low levels.
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Wind farm 'predator' effect hits ecosystems: study
Yahoo!7 News
Tue 6 November, 2018
Wind farms act as a top "predator" in some ecosystems, harming birds at the top of the food chain and triggering a knock-on effect overlooked by green energy advocates, scientists said Monday.
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The new design for the Sydney Fish Market looks great but where’s the solar?
The Fifth Estate
Tue 6 November, 2018
Nothing says Sydney lifestyle quite as exuberantly as its fish markets. On any day it typically hosts a swarm of humanity, feasting the senses and tempting the appetite. So a redevelopment of its crusty old buildings has been high on the agenda for the NSW government, in particular because of its premium location at Blackwattle Bay, on the edge of the CBD and in the emerging residential hot spot of Pyrmont.
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How blockchain could boost pre-fab and green buildings
The Fifth Estate
Tue 6 November, 2018
Blockchain might be the missing ingredient that prefabricated homes need to go mainstream. According to Aurecon’s fourth Buildings of the Future report, provided exclusively to The Fifth Estate, “leapfrog” technologies such as blockchain and cryptocurrencies have the potential to dramatically change how buildings are designed, constructed and managed.
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From The Cod Wars to climate change: a brief history of salted cod
SBS World News Australia
Tue 6 November, 2018
You may not know from looking at it, but salted cod, the North Atlantic preserved fish staple in Portuguese, Spanish and Scandinavian diets, used to cause actual battles between countries.
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Hurricanes and water wars threaten the Gulf Coast’s new high-end oyster industry
The Conversation
Tue 6 November, 2018
For Cainnon Gregg, 2018 started out as a great year. After leaving his job as an installation artist to become a full-time oyster farmer in Wakulla County, Florida in 2017, Gregg began raising small oysters in baskets or bags suspended in the shallow, productive coastal waters of Apalachicola Bay.
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Missing Japanese island baffles locals and scientists
News.com.au
Tue 6 November, 2018
IN ONE of the most confusing magic tricks of all time, a small island has vanished into thin air, and no one knows where it went.
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The Advertiser
The Geelong Advertiser
The Gold Coast Bulletin
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Tropical marine conservation needs to change as coral reefs decline
The Conversation
Tue 6 November, 2018
The world’s tropical oceans are suffering turbulent times. Dire predictions of yet more disastrous coral bleaching episodes have been released, placing the very future of wonders like the Great Barrier Reef in danger. Without global action to prevent runaway climate change, we as individuals are largely powerless to stop such loss.
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Scotland’s most remote islands don’t want to be in ‘inset maps’ any more
The Conversation
Tue 6 November, 2018
Take a 12 hour ferry north from mainland Scotland, and you’ll reach the Shetland Isles – the northernmost place in the UK. The only part of Britain to be considered “subarctic”, the archipelago of about 100 islands is found at the same latitude as the southern tip of Greenland. It’s so far north that, on most maps of the UK or Scotland, Shetland is cut out and placed in an inserted box somewhere off the coast of Aberdeenshire or the Highlands.
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Campaigning groups lead, a lot
The Fifth Estate
Tue 6 November, 2018
Campaigning groups have never been more powerful at changing policy debates and getting their concerns into the public eye. When issues grab the headlines seemingly out of the blue, it is almost always because clever campaigners have worked to put them there.
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Solar farms power council’s economic agenda
Government News
Mon 5 November, 2018
A small regional council’s sustainability program is creating 800 construction jobs and delivering $90 million to the local economy.
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'We want to do everything we can': NSW readies for renewables surge
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 5 November, 2018
New solar and wind farms being planned for NSW have twice the capacity of the state's coal-fired power stations, prompting the state government to set aside $55 million to help smooth their introduction.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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FRV’s Goonumbla solar farm lands deal with Snowy Hydro
Reneweconomy
Mon 5 November, 2018
Spanish renewable energy developer FRV says it will build its sixth solar project in Australia after revealing that its Goonumbla solar project in NSW was one of the eight winning bids in the tender held by Snowy Hydro.
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Urban forests: councils tackle urban tree decline
Government News
Mon 5 November, 2018
Local governments are exploring creative ways to revive greenery in cities as growing populations and urban density put tree cover at risk.
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Government experts say plan to prevent animal extinctions is failing
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 5 November, 2018
The Morrison government's own threatened species experts say Australia is failing in its plan to save wildlife from extinction and the crisis is damaging the nation’s reputation overseas.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Rangers slam car arson trend as Canberra bushfire mop-up continues
ABC News
Mon 5 November, 2018
Canberra rangers say one of a growing number of car fires sparked the blaze that led to a watch and act alert on the outskirts of Canberra, as the community vents its anger over the close call.
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