Issue date : Mon 5 November, 2018
Estimated Reading Time : 04 Min 20 Seconds
Number of items : 51
Kerryn Phelps zeroes in on climate change and Peter Dutton's eligibility
The Guardian
Mon 5 November, 2018
The newly minted independent MP for Wentworth, Kerryn Phelps, has pledged to tackle climate change policy as her first priority after she was formally declared the winner of the once blue ribbon Liberal seat in Sydney’s east.
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Coal mine rejuvenation bill could be left with NSW taxpayers
ABC News
Mon 5 November, 2018
Taxpayers could one day be slugged hundreds of millions of dollars to backfill some of Australia's biggest coal-mining pits, with a new report finding less than a third have been rejuvenated properly.
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Is corporate Australia facing a 'tipping point' on climate change?
The Age
Mon 5 November, 2018
In the parlance of climate science, a "tipping point" is a dire prospect – a critical threshold breach that triggers an abrupt and rapid change in climate.
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The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Farming For a Better Future
ProBono Australia News
Mon 5 November, 2018
Anika Molesworth is not your ordinary farmer. Founder of Farmers for Climate Action, she’s on a mission to change the future of farming through sustainable practices, and fighting the endless battle making people take climate change seriously. She’s this week’s changemaker.
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Better data would help crack the drought insurance problem
The Conversation
Mon 5 November, 2018
While drought policy raises many complex emotional, political and policy issues, it can be helpful to think of it as an insurance problem: how can we best help farmers manage climate risk?
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Politics of science: 'John Howard, the scientists' friend'
The Canberra Times
Mon 5 November, 2018
The winner of this year's Prime Minister’s Prize for Science has some views on prime ministers. Hawke? "He was interested", the scientist who has interacted with every prime minister since Malcolm Fraser said. Bob Hawke, Professor Kurt Lambeck said, was particularly interested in the science of nuclear waste and showed that interest to scientists long after he had left office.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Major oil spill off Australia's coast would dwarf Deepwater Horizon disaster, documents show
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 4 November, 2018
A worst-case oil spill in the Great Australian Bight would be twice the scale of the Gulf of Mexico disaster, and rough seas and a lack of suitable equipment risk delaying the response effort, confidential plans show.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
NSW Government to finally turn off raw sewage pipes near Bondi
The Australian
Sun 4 November, 2018
After more than a century of raw sewage draining into the ocean north of Sydney’s iconic Bondi Beach, the state government has promised to stop it.
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SBS World News Australia
Coalition retreat won't stop shift to clean energy, says Bill Ferris
The Australian Financial Review
Sun 4 November, 2018
Business and state governments will press on with the shift to clean energy despite the federal government's retreat from policies to combat climate change, says outgoing Science and Innovation Australia chair Bill Ferris.
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Charles taught princes to pick up litter
News.com.au
Sun 4 November, 2018
Princes William and Harry have paid tribute to their father's commitment to the environment and his sons in a documentary to mark Prince Charles' 70th birthday.
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Perthnow
The Age
The Australian
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
The Courier Mail
The Gold Coast Bulletin
The Mercury
The Sydney Morning Herald
The West Australian
WAToday
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Faith: We need to take care of our beautiful but fragile environment
The Age
Sun 4 November, 2018
“And God saw everything he had made, and indeed, it was very good”. Before recorded history, space research and scientific discovery, thoughtful people have pondered and struggled with the question: how did it all happen? This amazing universe, of which we are a tiny part, of which we can only get a glimpse with human resources.
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The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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ABC 'Disappearing Islands' Claim Proved False. Again
The Herald Sun
Sun 4 November, 2018
The Pacific nation of Kiribati... is disappearing underwater. Tarawa, the atoll where nearly half the country's population lives, could soon disappear. There is no evidence at all for that ABC claim.
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More ACT homes powered by renewables as Crookwell 2 feeds into grid
The Canberra Times
Sun 4 November, 2018
The ACT has taken another step towards its goal of being powered by 100 per cent renewable energy in 2020, with another wind farm starting to feed into the national grid on Saturday.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Solar batteries close, but not quite there yet for the typical family
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 4 November, 2018
With the hot weather returning and pool pumps and airconditioners springing back to life after a six-month hibernation, more householders will be asking themselves if it is time to go solar.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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The parallel universes of thermal coal
The Australian Financial Review
Sun 4 November, 2018
In one cosmos we have arguably the most financially literate of the anti-fossil-fuel lobby, the IEEFA, mounting an apparently data-filled argument that the home of Australian thermal coal, the Hunter Valley, is now on track to "terminal decline as markets transition away from coal".
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Warming 'like comet speeding to Earth', expert tells Perth audience
WAToday
Sun 4 November, 2018
An international sustainability expert has used a Perth lecture to liken climate change to “a comet speeding to Earth”; but also to describe radical renewable energy efforts worldwide, and encourage Australia to join that groundswell.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
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The big appeal of tiny houses
The New Daily
Sun 4 November, 2018
They look adorable, have the whimsical, carefree aesthetic of a cubby, and are at the core of a social and political movement that objects to housing trends and prices and embraces sustainability, downsizing and simple living.
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Future generations being short-changed
The Courier Mail
Sun 4 November, 2018
I HAVE seen kangaroos as thick as fleas on a cur, koalas so populous people complained of their stink and burrowing wombats so numerous the unwary trod their habitat. But are my grandchildren and their children to share these pleasures of their birthright?
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'Getting close': El Nino event seen as not far off as Sydney sizzles
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sun 4 November, 2018
The hot start to November may be a taste of the summer to come with meteorologists watching a Pacific Ocean that is being primed for an El Nino event.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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An inconvenient truth for Gore
The Australian
Sat 3 November, 2018
Climate champion Al Gore has given a frank assessment of the latest UN report into the dangers of global warming. Interviewed by US public broadcaster PBS, Gore said the language used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in its report on limiting global warming to 1.5C had been “torqued up” a little to get the ­attention of policymakers.
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Sustainability not just environmental
The Australian
Sat 3 November, 2018
I have a simple attitude when it comes to the issue of climate change. And that is: it’s not my field of expertise, and not one that lends itself to amateur conjecture. It is prudent to take the advice of experts. I therefore accept that there is a need to take corrective action now in order to avoid environmental catastrophe in the future. I understand some do not agree that the science is settled; however, the overwhelming scientific consensus seems to be that we need to act now.
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Ray of sunshine let me skip $50,000 bill
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 3 November, 2018
Although the term “solar system” usually refers to our heliocentric colloquium of planets, asteroids, comets and assorted gravity-tethered junk it could equally designate the arrangement of wires, batteries and photovoltaic panels that hover above my head as I write. I can’t tell you how much I love it, my little solar system.
Also Appeared In
The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Pierces Creek fire is a wake up call for the bush capital
The Canberra Times
Sat 3 November, 2018
The Pierces Creek bushfire has come early in the season. It highlights the magnitude of the fire threat created by one of our driest Octobers on record.
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Former UN climate chief says world doesn't need Australia's 'toxic' coal
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 3 November, 2018
Former United Nations climate chief Christiana Figueres has repudiated Australian mining giant BHP for its refusal to stop mining coal, suggesting the decision is uneconomic and poor nations do not need the “toxic” and “expensive” fossil fuel.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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After about 1000 years, Venice is imperiled
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 3 November, 2018
Venice, Italy: Near the Accademia Bridge, a corridor of thin trees lay horizontal, as if hit by a nuclear wind. Vaporetto tickets, pigeon feathers and candy wrappers floated in stagnant pools around St Mark's Basilica. Saltwater seeped into the private gardens and poisoned rose bushes behind stone walls.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Taking a stand
Australian Journal of Pharmacy
Fri 2 November, 2018
Should pharmacy adopt a stronger position on environmental issues? AJP editor Chris Brooker argues that the time is right for pharmacy to take a stand
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Palau to ban sunscreen to save coral reef
9 News
Fri 2 November, 2018
In an attempt to protect the coral reefs that divers so admire they have dubbed them the underwater Serengeti, the Pacific nation of Palau will soon ban many types of sunscreen.
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News.com.au
SBS World News Australia
The Advertiser
The Australian
The Daily Telegraph
The Gold Coast Bulletin
The Herald Sun
The Mercury
The Newcastle Herald
The Weekly Times
Topic Also Covered By
Untapped WA wealth awaits in carbon farming
The West Australian
Fri 2 November, 2018
WA is in an strong position to claim a major slice of Australia’s rapidly developing $24 billion carbon farming industry with untapped opportunity across its pastoral lands, a climate change mitigation group boss says.
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How Eurasia’s Tianshan mountains set a stage that changed the world
The Conversation
Fri 2 November, 2018
Nestled deep in Central Asia, the Tianshan is a huge mountain range that stretches from Uzbekistan in the west, all the way through to China and Mongolia in the east. It is more than 2,500km in length and has numerous peaks that soar to over 7,000m in height.
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One way to reduce food waste: Use it to make soil healthier
The Conversation
Fri 2 November, 2018
Imagine that one-third of cars manufactured by Ford or GM were never even driven once, but instead were left to rust and ended up in landfills. This exact situation is true today in agriculture, where up to 40 percent of food produced every year in the United States is never eaten.
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Sustainability makes splash
The West Australian
Fri 2 November, 2018
Abundance is in the eye of the beholder, as chef Scott Bridger shows in his menus.
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2018 among hottest and driest years so far in parts of Australia
The Guardian
Fri 2 November, 2018
As a bushfire burned out of control south-west of Canberra and temperatures in Sydney climbed towards the high 30s, new data showed 2018 had so far been among the hottest and driest years on record for parts of Australia.
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