Issue date : Wed 17 October, 2018
Estimated Reading Time : 03 Min 34 Seconds
Number of items : 42
Ian Kiernan, Clean Up Australia founder and yachtsman, dies aged 78
ABC News
Wed 17 October, 2018
Ian Kiernan, an environmental campaigner who grew to international fame for his work and as a yachtsman, has died aged 78 after being diagnosed with cancer in late July.
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The Guardian
Ian Kiernan, founder of Clean Up Australia, dies aged 78
SBS World News Australia
Clean Up Australia founder Ian Kiernan dies at age 78
The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
The Herald Sun
News.com.au
Clean Up Australia founder Ian Kiernan dies
The Australian
Clean Up founder Ian Kiernan dies aged 78
9 News
Ian Kiernan, Clean Up Australia founder, dies aged 78
Chevron gets lifeline on delayed Gorgon carbon capture
The West Australian
Wed 17 October, 2018
The McGowan Government has given oil and gas giant Chevron some breathing space for its increasingly desperate efforts to get the troubled Gorgon carbon capture and storage project working.
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Victorian draft deer management plan war warning
The Weekly Times
Wed 17 October, 2018
THE Victorian Government’s draft deer management plan has been described as weak and unable to fix the growing problems posed by deer, the Invasive Species Council has warned.
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Rising sea levels threaten Mediterranean world heritage sites
Cosmos
Wed 17 October, 2018
Three quarters of the UNESCO World Heritage sites around the coast of the Mediterranean are at significant risk of loss through flooding or erosion because of sea level rises, modelling shows.
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Four Labels Specialising in Vegan “Leather”
Broadsheet
Wed 17 October, 2018
Local and international designers have responded to the shopping public’s growing vegan sensibility by making impressive, idiosyncratic advances in quality fake leather.
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WA losing Australia's renewable energy race, Climate Council report finds
ABC News
Tue 16 October, 2018
A new Climate Council report has found despite 27 per cent of West Australian households having solar panels installed, the state is lagging far behind the rest of the country in its renewable energy generation.
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National parks claims 'absurd': Upton
News.com.au
Tue 16 October, 2018
NSW Environment Minister Gabrielle Upton has dismissed suggestions the government gave in to the Nationals when it dumped plans to expand national parks.
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The Advertiser
The Australian
The Weekly Times
Yahoo!7 News
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Farmers facing drought are on the front line of climate change
The Sydney Morning Herald
Tue 16 October, 2018
When you live on the land, droughts can be soul destroying. They creep up silently, and slowly but surely tighten like a vice. They get into your bones. There’s no knowing when the drought will break, or just how far you’ll be pushed.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
Meeting royals a victory for koala diplomacy, but not for survival
The Sydney Morning Herald
Tue 16 October, 2018
It was a victory for koala diplomacy. Despite being unable to continue the long tradition of English royalty fondling koalas – apparently, it is now illegal to hold koalas in NSW – Prince Harry and his wife Meghan nevertheless made time for the marsupials during their first royal tour Down Under.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
Whitehaven focuses on ramping up approvals for new coal mine
The Sydney Morning Herald
Tue 16 October, 2018
Whitehaven Coal remains bullish on its cleaner thermal coal and bringing new coal mines online as its production levels tumble for the quarter.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
Topic Also Covered By
Impact investors win 13 per cent growth rate as the sector rapidly develops
The Fifth Estate
Tue 16 October, 2018
Investors who put their money into social and environmentally worthwhile projects aren’t looking back. They’ve enjoyed excellent returns – 13 per cent annually on a compound basis. Globally, their assets grew from US$30.8 billion (AU$55 billon) in 2013 to US$50.8 billion (AU$71 billion) in 2017 at a time when there are calls to accelerate adoption of impact measurement and management.
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The devil is in the lack of detail
Investment Magazine
Tue 16 October, 2018
A study by environmental finance group Market Forces reveals Australia’s biggest and most climate risk-exposed companies are progressing towards climate risk disclosure, albeit at a glacial pace.
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Can pumped hydro grab centre stage from battery storage?
Reneweconomy
Tue 16 October, 2018
Sometime in the next month or two, the first investment in what will be a significant new stage in the transition to a renewable energy dominated grid in Australia will be made.
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Green light for Tasmanian wilderness tourism development defied expert advice
The Conversation
Tue 16 October, 2018
The Commonwealth government’s decision to wave through a controversial tourism development in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area was made in defiance of strident opposition from the expert statutory advisory body for the region’s management, it was revealed today.
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How catching malaria gave me a new perspective on saving gorillas
The Conversation
Tue 16 October, 2018
Conservationists are in a desperate fight to save the last of the world’s gorillas. Numbers of some subspecies are so low that organisations are literally saving the species one gorilla at a time.
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Cultural heritage has a lot to teach us about climate change
The Conversation
Tue 16 October, 2018
Museums, archaeological sites and historical buildings are rarely included in conversations about climate change, which tend to focus on the wider impact and global threats to our contemporary world. Yet these threats impact everything, from local cultural practices to iconic sites of outstanding universal value. In light of this, it’s worth exploring the relationship between our heritage and the changing global climate in more detail.
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Illegal asbestos, waste and oil dumpers fined more than $555,000
The Brisbane Times
Tue 16 October, 2018
A Narangba waste disposal company that let cooking oil waste more than 16 times the lethal levels leak into wetlands was one of 12 companies to be fined a total of $555,000 in 2017-18, according to the Queensland Department of Environment and Science's annual report.
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The Age
The Canberra Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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Self-healing plastics one step closer to mainstream use
The Fifth Estate
Tue 16 October, 2018
Once viable on a commercial scale, self-healing materials could extend the lifespan of relatively inexpensive commodities, such as paints, plastics and coatings. This would ultimately reduce waste because these items wouldn’t need to be replaced or repaired as often.
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Dive marathon to raise funds for reef campaign
Cosmos
Tue 16 October, 2018
Divers at the University of Queensland in Australia will spend 24 hours under water in an effort to raise money and awareness for coral reefs.
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