Issue date : Mon 19 June, 2017
Estimated Reading Time : 05 Min 26 Seconds
Number of items : 64
Finkel numbers don’t add up
The Australian
Mon 19 June, 2017
We all know damned lies and statistics can be misleading. So too can graphs, modelling assumptions and the omission or glossing over of critically important information. Take the Finkel report.
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Paris never the answer to warming concerns
The Australian
Mon 19 June, 2017
President Donald Trump’s withdrawal of the US from the Paris climate agreement leaves his country without a global warming policy. That is alarming. But the world’s response — to double down on the pact in opposition to Trump — should also cause concern. There have been two conflicting responses to Trump’s decision — often heard from the very same person.
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Bundaberg, solar capital of Australia?
Energy Matters
Mon 19 June, 2017
With a stellar year of growth in solar for the city of Bundaberg the town’s mayor believes they may soon be able to hold the crown as the countries solar capital.
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SA kangaroo count underway
News.com.au
Mon 19 June, 2017
South Australia's annual kangaroo count is underway to provide information on kangaroo populations across the state.
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9 News
The Australian
Yahoo!7 News
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Numbats get cracking on termite treat
The West Australian
Mon 19 June, 2017
The Perth Zoo had only a pair of numbats when Vicki Power started work as a zookeeper in 1987.
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Why Did An Enormous Chunk Of West Antarctica Suddenly Start Melting?
Gizmodo Australia
Mon 19 June, 2017
300,000 square miles is nearly twice the area of California. It's difficult to visualise a space that vast, but go ahead and give it a try. Now, imagine this California plus-sized chunk of land is covered in thousands of feet of ice. Then, all of a sudden, that frozen fortress becomes a wading pool.
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Land use threat to WA ecosystems
The West Australian
Mon 19 June, 2017
Urgent changes to the State’s regional land management policies must occur to prevent the loss of WA’s diverse ecosystems.
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Some let down by China's war on pollution
Yahoo!7 News
Mon 19 June, 2017
Hebei province, home to many of China's most polluted cities, has promised to close down companies that are poisoning the environment, but after years of protests villagers living in the shadows of the Guantao chemical park remain sceptical.
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Australia’s war against food waste
International Business Times
Mon 19 June, 2017
Australia opens war against food waste as the government embarks on a significant push to cut down food meant for landfills. By giving “waste” a second chance, the nation may save billions per year.
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Don't treat Australia like a rubbish tip - ban plastic bags, straws and cups
The Sydney Morning Herald
Mon 19 June, 2017
Twenty years ago we brought our family to this beautiful country to live - we came here to provide our children with a safe and beautiful place in which they could grow up. When we were granted citizenship two years later we were so very proud to be called Australian - anyone who migrates here will know how hard it is to get a visa to live in this country. In those days we regarded it as an honour to be accepted here - and a privilege to live here. We loved the pride Australians had for their country.
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A more sustainable future demands better collaboration with young Australians
Food & Beverage
Mon 19 June, 2017
Increased intergenerational collaboration to unleash the power of Australia’s next generation of entrepreneurs is key to solving global challenges, said experts who gathered today in Sydney at the ‘Creating a More Sustainable World’ forum.
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Pope urges Merkel to fight for climate deal
Sky News Australia
Sun 18 June, 2017
Pope Francis has asked Germany to keep fighting for the Paris climate change deal and to 'tear down walls' that inhibit international cooperation, Chancellor Angela Merkel says, offering a stark contrast between her agenda and US policy.
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Climate change zealots need to get real
The Daily Telegraph
Sun 18 June, 2017
WELL, now we know. The biggest deniers in the whole climate change debate are those who think we can have affordable power, lower emissions and a reliable network.
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News.com.au
NT News
Perthnow
The Advertiser
The Australian
The Courier Mail
The Geelong Advertiser
The Gold Coast Bulletin
The Herald Sun
The Mercury
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The Finkel Report: Back To The Future And The 1960s
New Matilda
Sun 18 June, 2017
The Finkel Report is not only too accommodating of the Coalition’s coal fetish, as Ben Eltham points out. It’s also too conservative from an engineering perspective because it’s constructed around a 1960s model of electricity supply, writes Ian McAuley.
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Endangered moth on new Bangladesh, India high commission sites
The Canberra Times
Sun 18 June, 2017
The Bangladesh High Commission's move from O'Malley to Yarralumla will require another layer of approval after an endangered moth habitat was found on its planned new site.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Newcastle Herald
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
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First moments of freedom for elephant, held captive for 50 years
Yahoo!7 News
Sun 18 June, 2017
After 50 years chained in captivity, a partially blind and badly injured 70-year-old Indian temple elephant has taken its first steps of freedom, thanks to the work of wildlife rescuers and local police.
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From luxury hotels to slums, Haiti puts used soap to good use
Yahoo!7 News
Sun 18 June, 2017
Port-au-Prince (AFP) - A Haitian program to recycle used soap bars from luxury hotels has proven a win-win-win proposition, reducing waste, helping fight water-borne disease and giving employees like Magoiana Fremond the chance to send her kids to school and let them "eat every day."
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MCA push to regulate green cash
The Australian
Sat 17 June, 2017
The Minerals Council of Australia says the rules for bodies that receive tax-deductible donations should be tightened as the government seeks feedback on possible changes to the system.
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Trump's climate snub: hold the outrage, we're just as bad
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 17 June, 2017
It's hard to put your finger on the most startling thing about Donald Trump's decision to give the one-finger salute to the Paris climate agreement, but one of its more incredible effects is that it finally knocks Australia off its perch as global climate pariah sans pareil. Which is quite extraordinary really, when you consider that the septuagenarian plutocrat currently passing for Leader of the Free World has only been officially meddling in global climate deals for 200-odd days, while we've been assiduously shirking our responsibilities and thwarting international negotiations for nigh on two decades.
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Direct Action has failed; let’s get on with Finkel report
The Australian
Sat 17 June, 2017
The statement by Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg on Q&A on Monday night that “business as usual is not an option”, and repeated since, summarises the most important thing to emerge from this week’s arguments: the government is now admitting that its Direct Action policy, that is “business as usual”, is not working.
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James Thornton: Saving the planet, one court case at a time
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 17 June, 2017
Meet lawyer James Thornton, the soaring force in environmental activism. His foe: recalcitrant governments and big industrial polluters. His battleground: the courtroom. His client: the planet.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Making a meal out of energy policy
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 17 June, 2017
When you are feeling hungry, is it better to just grab something quick or look around for something good? Should you scrutinise all of the ingredients or try to and stick to some big-picture dietary rules and not sweat the small stuff? Do your friends and family share your approach? Do you take turns deciding, or agree on things that no one loves and no one hates?
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Canberra offers tips on snuggling up for a clean, green winter
The Australian
Sat 17 June, 2017
Everyone is talking about the price of energy. A few weeks ago I received a pamphlet from the ACT government on energy-­saving tips. For winter it featured a picture of a family all in overcoats and beanies, huddled under an electric blanket. For summer it had helpful advice like open a window at night. If you want to see the clean, green energy future, there is no need to travel to South Australia. Come to the nation’s capital.
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Minerals Council backs Latrobe coal-fired power station
The Australian
Sat 17 June, 2017
The Minerals Council of Australia has backed the construction of a new brown coal-fired power plant in Victoria’s Latrobe Valley using the latest technology that it says is capable of driving emissions down by up to 40 per cent.
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Bougainville Copper Limited's Panguna mine hits roadblock from protesters
ABC News
Sat 17 June, 2017
The push to reopen a controversial copper mine on the island of Bougainville has suffered a setback, with opposition groups stopping the region's government from going to the mine site and signing a new agreement with landowners.
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Bike-sharing boom travels from China to rest of the world
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 17 June, 2017
Beijing: The bike-sharing boom reached Australia last week, as rows of 'free' yellow bicycles appeared on Melbourne's streets. Sydney is next, with hundreds of red bikes due in July.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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AusPost launches e-vehicle trial in Brisbane
Logistics & Materials Handling
Sat 17 June, 2017
A three-wheel electric delivery vehicle trial has begun in Brisbane, servicing Coorparoo, Woolloongabba and East Brisbane over an eight-week period. The e-vehicle has three times the parcel carrying capacity of the motorbikes currently used by Australia Post for deliveries – it can hold up to 100 small parcels and 1,200 letters at a time.
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Why fight for wildlife icon matters
The Mercury
Sat 17 June, 2017
BUSES converted into mobile mange treatment clinics, a government crew dedicated to treating, holding and relocating wombats and a mange hotline ... these are just some of the things Tasmania needs if it wants to save its wombat population, volunteers say.
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The Geelong Advertiser
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Scientists mapping Australia's deep sea floor find rubbish at depths up to four kilometres, rare deep-sea creatures
ABC News
Sat 17 June, 2017
An international group of scientists have used new technology to plumb the dark depths of Australia's eastern abyss for the first time, revealing an exciting array of rare sea life but also rubbish a kilometre under water.
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The Herald Sun
Scientists find new species during deep dive into an abyss off Australia’s east coast
The Sydney Morning Herald
Deep sea trawl finds never-seen fish, faceless fish and the shortarse feelerfish
The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
9 News
Zombie worms found in Aust deep sea abyss
SBS World News Australia
The West Australian
Yahoo!7 News
National Geographic Australia
Australia’s Freaky Deep Sea Creatures
Talking Point: Like salmon, we are all in the poo
The Mercury
Sat 17 June, 2017
I HAVE been speaking to many people over the past few weeks — friends, customers, staff, politicians (and aspiring politicians), as well as strangers that stop me in the supermarket, in the street and whenever I am out in public.
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Turning plastics into swimwear
The Sydney Morning Herald
Sat 17 June, 2017
With single-use plastic bags about to be banned in Queensland, one local scientist is striving to curb the trash already clogging the sea.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Get Finkel: the campaign to undermine a new energy policy
The Australian Financial Review
Fri 16 June, 2017
The calls and texts started almost before the Finkel report was officially released at the Council of Australian Government meeting in Hobart last Friday.
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Every galah in the pet shop is now an energy expert
The Australian Financial Review
Fri 16 June, 2017
When Cory Bernardi confided this week that he had put a whopping great solar system on top of his Adelaide home, he wasn't accepting the science of climate change. Instead, the former Liberal and now Australia Conservatives senator said his purchase was necessitated by soaring power prices, caused by almost a decade of paralysis and dysfunction on energy policy.
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DHL and Ford to manufacture electric van
Logistics & Materials Handling
Fri 16 June, 2017
Germany’s Deutsche Post DHL Group is planning to collaborate with Ford on the design of a new electric van.
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Call for shark study to be extended to WA
The West Australian
Fri 16 June, 2017
State Fisheries Minister Dave Kelly says a Federal study into great white shark populations should be extended to sample the species’ south-western population in WA, but studying white sharks has proved to be a difficult task for researchers.
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Nobel-equivalent Kyoto Prize awarded to Australian scientist Graham Farquhar
ABC News
Fri 16 June, 2017
Scientist Graham Farquhar's work improving water-efficient crops and analysing climate change has made him the first Australian to receive the prestigious Kyoto Prize.
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The Australian
Aussie plant scientist Graham Farquhar wins Kyoto Prize
The Canberra Times
First Australian Kyoto Prize won by ANU scientist Graham Farquhar
The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Sydney Morning Herald
WAToday
The Australian
Imposter syndrome: global fame goes against grain