Issue date : Fri 15 December, 2017
Estimated Reading Time : 04 Min 20 Seconds
Number of items : 51
Sydney’s closer to being a zero-carbon city than you think
The Conversation
Fri 15 December, 2017
You live in one of the sunniest countries in the world. You might want to use that solar advantage and harvest all this free energy. Knowing that solar panels are rapidly becoming cheaper and have become feasible even in less sunny places like the UK, this should be a no-brainer.
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Audit office slams Australia’s dud investments in “clean coal”
Reneweconomy
Fri 15 December, 2017
Clean coal may be a marketing term that you can still read in the Murdoch press and hear on the ABC, but the technology remains nothing more than a fantasy – and a point of distraction and a lacquered prop for the fossil fuel industry and its proponents.
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Sydney uni gets its whole-earth hat on
Cosmos
Fri 15 December, 2017
The University of Sydney, Australia, has launched a unique program called Planetary Health to aid the fight against climate change and boost our planet’s health.
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NAB quits funding of new thermal coal projects
Australian Mining
Fri 15 December, 2017
National Australia Bank (NAB) will no longer fund new thermal coal projects in Australia, making it the first of the country’s ‘big four’ banks to officially quit support of the sector.
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Ecotourism ventures to become easier
The West Australian
Fri 15 December, 2017
A three-month red-tape-slashing process will pave the way for eco-tourism businesses to get up and running, according to Tourism Minister Paul Papalia.
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AGL turns the government down
The Sydney Morning Herald
Fri 15 December, 2017
When the power company AGL announced last September its deadline to close the Liddell power station in the Hunter Valley, all hell broke loose. The Prime Minister spoke in parliament on the matter. He called a meeting with the company's management and tried to strong-arm them into keeping Liddell's antique boilers boiling and its turbines spinning for five more years.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Anti-shark measures that work
The Australian
Fri 15 December, 2017
It’s not unusual for a parliamentary committee to come up with recommendations that miss the mark but it must be some kind of record for a taxpayer-funded inquiry into a life-and-death issue to urge the abandonment of the one method known to work over decades. And so it is that a Senate inquiry led by Tasmanian Green Peter Whish-Wilson has come up with the sunstruck suggestion that NSW and Queensland should take their shark nets and drumlines out of the water. Pre-empting the silly season, Labor members of the committee agreed.
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EnergyAustralia is planning to turn garbage into electricity
The Sydney Morning Herald
Fri 15 December, 2017
EnergyAustralia has a rubbish idea. The energy giant plans to generate power from rubbish at its Mt Piper power station, in NSW.
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The Age
The Brisbane Times
The Canberra Times
WAToday
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Hungary plans big boost in solar power generation
Yahoo!7 News
Fri 15 December, 2017
BUDAPEST (Reuters) - Hungary will relax rules on the construction of small solar power plants and subsidize loans to landowners as part of efforts to promote renewable energy, a government official said on Thursday.
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ARENA awards $6m grant funding for Greatcell Solar's printable cell
Inside Waste
Fri 15 December, 2017
As part of a $17.3 million project to develop a new world-class prototype facility to scale up fabrication of high quality, large-area PV devices, the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) will provide $6 million to Greatcell Solar to accelerate development of a new printable PV solar cell.
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Crest-tailed mulgara rediscovered in NSW after century-long absence
Australian Geographic
Fri 15 December, 2017
A CREST-TAILED mulgara (Dasycercus cristicauda), not seen in New South Wales for almost a century and presumed extinct to the area, has been found in the Sturt National Park north-west of Tibooburra.
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Secret quokka colony joins the mainland ratrace
The Australian
Fri 15 December, 2017
Ecologists are studying the survival tactics of a secret mainland colony of quokkas, the placid, wallaby-like foragers that have become synonymous with the holiday island of Rottnest.
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‘Yuck’ fears don’t hold water for recycled H2O
The Daily Telegraph
Fri 15 December, 2017
SYDNEYSIDERS need to get over the “yuck factor” associ­ated with drinking recycled wastewater to protect the state against future droughts.
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The Geelong Advertiser
The Gold Coast Bulletin
The Herald Sun
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EPA seeks input to rework rule on lead in drinking water
Yahoo!7 News
Fri 15 December, 2017
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said on Thursday it will seek input from state and local officials as it considers how to rework a 1991 rule meant to protect people from lead and copper contamination in drinking water.
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‘Tis the season to redesign and reduce our waste
The Conversation
Thu 14 December, 2017
On average, each Canadian produces 720 kilograms of municipal waste — more than the per capita output in the United States and double what is produced in Japan. And over the holidays, our waste volumes double.
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UK supermarkets look to bottle deposits
News.com.au
Fri 15 December, 2017
Britain could soon follow Australia's lead and introduce a return scheme for bottles in a bid to cut plastic pollution with two supermarkets backing the idea.
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The Australian
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Lab-grown meat could let humanity ignore a serious moral failing
The Conversation
Fri 15 December, 2017
Lab-grown meat is being hailed as the solution to the factory farming of animals. The downside of factory farming for the cows, chickens and pigs themselves is obvious enough. But it is also bad for human health, given the amount of antibiotics pumped into the animals, as well as for the environment, given the resources required to provide us with industrial quantities of meat.
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6th ERF auction result – millions more sunk in “vegetation” abatement
Reneweconomy
Thu 14 December, 2017
The results of the federal government’s latest Emissions Reduction Fund auction have been released by the Clean Energy Regulator, revealing the purchase of nearly 8 million tonnes of carbon abatement, at an average price of $13.08 per tonne.
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The Australian Financial Review
Emissions Reduction Fund awards $104m in contracts to reduce carbon emissions
Climate risk disclosure comes of age
The Fifth Estate
Thu 14 December, 2017
Companies’ disclosure of business risks from climate change could become mandatory in a few years as pressure from investors gathers pace.
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It’s all about money as global investors drive low-carbon transition
Reneweconomy
Thu 14 December, 2017
If the previous decade has seen the climate change space occupied by activists, scientists, denialists and fossil fuel companies, a coordinated push from investors for derisked portfolios, is setting the stage for a very different 2018 and beyond.
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Coal comfort as Origin vows to halve emissions by 2032
Reneweconomy
Thu 14 December, 2017
Origin Energy’s commitment to “science based” climate action has been reaffirmed this week, with the announcement of targets for a 50 per cent reduction in emissions from its coal and gas operations by 2032, and a 25 per cent cut in emissions from traded gas and electricity in that same timeframe.
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Sourceable
Origin to Halve Carbon Emissions by 2032
Biggest game-changer on network spending approved – a decade late
Reneweconomy
Thu 14 December, 2017
A demand management incentive scheme – touted as the biggest game-changer in network spending seen in Australia – has finally been approved by the country’s regulators. But it has come nearly a decade later than it should.
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Tesla big battery goes the full discharge – 100MW – for first time
Reneweconomy
Thu 14 December, 2017
The Tesla big battery remains the most watched aspect of Australia’s National Electricity Market – apart from the spate of Lack of Reserve notices in the current heatwave – and on Wednesday for the first time it discharged at its maximum capacity.
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Nightingale reaches the village scale – now “anything is possible”
The Fifth Estate
Thu 14 December, 2017
The Nightingale model, which has taken Australia’s housing imagination by storm, is about to do it again. This time over an entire street, opening the door to highly sustainable architect led development at the precinct scale.
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Feral cats declared an established pest in Victoria
The Weekly Times
Thu 14 December, 2017
The State Government today committed to change the law so that feral cats can be managed like wild dogs, potentially paving the way for baiting, trapping and even a bounty.
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Three men charged over shark dragging video in Florida
SBS World News Australia
Thu 14 December, 2017
Florida wildlife officials say they have identified three men dragging a shark behind a speeding boat in a video that went viral on several social media sites.
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New map highlights shark attack danger zones
The New Daily
Thu 14 December, 2017
More than 80 per cent of unprovoked fatal shark attacks in the past decade have occurred within 40 kilometres of wastewater outfalls, analysis by The New Daily reveals.
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Two new orchids found in SW ‘biodiversity hotspot’
The West Australian
Thu 14 December, 2017
Two new and previously unknown ‘fairy’ orchids have been discovered by Curtin University’s eminent botanist Professor Kingsley Dixon and Kew Garden scientist and Curtin Adjunct Lecturer, Dr Maarten Christenhuez, adding proof that south west Western Australia is truly a global biodiversity hotspot.
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China's industrial heartland struggles in Beijing's fight against smog
Yahoo!7 News
Thu 14 December, 2017
SHIJIAZHUANG, China (Reuters) - Severe natural gas shortages are hitting businesses and residents across China's industrial heartland as an unprecedented government effort to clean up an environment devastated by decades of unbridled growth backfires.
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NSW returns five million drink containers
Yahoo!7 News
Thu 14 December, 2017
Five million bottles and cans have been returned through NSW's container deposit scheme in the program's first two weeks.
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News.com.au
The Australian
The Daily Telegraph
The Herald Sun
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ADB approves $506 mln loan to improve air quality in China
Yahoo!7 News
Thu 14 December, 2017
BEIJING (Reuters) - The Asian Development Bank [ADB.UL] (ADB) approved a third loan, worth 428 million euros ($506 million), to help improve air quality in China's smoggiest region of Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei, it said in a statement on Thursday.
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Investigation into Bridgetown brook foam spill
The West Australian
Thu 14 December, 2017
An investigation is continuing into how a quantity of white foam was released into Geegeelup Brook in Bridgetown on Thursday.
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Why I stopped using coffee pods and bought a 'proper' espresso machine
SBS World News Australia
Thu 14 December, 2017
Once upon a time, serious coffee nerds bought French presses. We used to call them plungers in my family, and we brought them out at the end of every meal. My parents shelled out for pre-ground beans in little foil packets from the supermarket, instead of using instant coffee from a jar. I remember once going to a shop that ground fresh beans for us in a giant mill – it smelt amazing. Back then, fancy cafes even gave you your own little French press to use at the table.
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Putting algae and seaweed on the menu could help save our seafood
The Conversation
Thu 14 December, 2017
If we have to feed 9.8 billion people by 2050, food from the ocean will have to play a major role. Ending hunger and malnutrition while meeting the demand for more meat and fish as the world grows richer will require 60% more food by the middle of the century.
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Australia will cop extreme temperatures as heatwave begins
News.com.au
Thu 14 December, 2017
SCORCHING weather will smash Sydney and NSW today — as a seven-day heatwave begins. And Victoria could be sweltering by early next week too.
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The Daily Telegraph
The Herald Sun
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Fire weather warning issued as Sydney braces for 42C
The Daily Telegraph
Thu 14 December, 2017
WATERBOMBING helicopters and Rural Fire Service crews have managed to contain and push a bushfire away from homes near Cessnock in the NSW Hunter Region, as temperatures across the state soar.
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News.com.au
Perthnow
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