Business Insider

appeared 7 July 2017

Most solar farms align their solar arrays in rows and columns to form a grid.

A new solar power plant in Datong, China, however, decided to have a little fun with its design.
China Merchants New Energy Group, one of the country’s largest clean energy operators, built a 248-acre solar farm in the shape of a giant panda.

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Washington Post

appeared 5 July 2017

I’ve been a mountaineer for most of my life. Mountains are in my blood. In my early 20s, while climbing in France, I fell into a crevasse on the Milieu Glacier, at the start of the normal route on the Aiguille d’Argentiere. Remarkably, I was unhurt. From the grip of the banded ice, I saw a thin slit of blue sky 120 feet above me. The math was simple: Climb 120 feet. If I reached that slit of blue sky, I would live. If I didn’t, I’d freeze to death in the cold and dark.

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Eco-Business

appeared 29 June 2019

More companies are now reporting the impact they have on the environment and society. But where is the value in doing this, and what affect does it have in the real world? Eco-Business asked the new chief executive of Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), Tim Mohin.

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Financial Times

appeared 29 June 2017

Financial markets have the potential to improve our prospects for tackling climate change, but only if we make climate risks and opportunities more transparent. Public policy, technology and consumer preferences are advancing, but this backdrop is complex and dynamic. Climate policy can be made and unmade, disruptive technologies can create and destroy value.

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The New York Times

appeared 26 June 2017

MIAMI BEACH — Meeting in a city confronted daily with the issues of rising seas and climate change, the United States Conference of Mayors approved resolutions on Monday to urge the federal government to rejoin the Paris climate agreement and to redouble their own efforts to combat climate change and commit to renewable energy.

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The Huffington Post

appeared 20 June 2017

The insurance industry’s annual confab last week was supposed to be a dry, stoic affair.
Instead, anti-coal protesters stormed the 44th Geneva Association conference at a ritzy hotel in San Francisco, plastered the bathrooms with slogan stickers and slipped fliers under the doors to executives’ rooms. A plane toting a banner reading “unfriend coal” circled the high-rise where the executives held their closing dinner and cocktail party.

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